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PLAYING AROUND

It might not feel like fall in Northeast Florida yet, but the fall arts season is in full swing. This is one busy weekend for visual arts, with several major openings.

 

‘Paint Techtonics’

New York painter Leslie Wayne’s exhibit of abstract art created by building layers of oil paint into 3-D compositions opens J. Johnson Gallery's season. You have never seen paintings like these. The paint is sculpted, scraped, cut and combined to create works evocative of geological and oceanographic forms.

Reception 6-8 p.m. Sept. 20, exhibit continues through Nov. 1

J. Johnson Gallery, 177 Fourth Ave. N., Jacksonville Beach

435-3200, jjohnsongallery.com

 

‘Abstraction Over Time: The Paintings of Michael Goldberg’

The Museum of Contemporary Arts Jacksonville mounts the first retrospective exhibit to encompass the entire span of Michael Goldberg's career. Goldberg was an abstract expressionist who discussed art and studied with Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline. Goldberg died in 2008, but his wife, the artist Lynn Umlauf, will attend the opening.

Reception 6 p.m. Sept. 20 for patrons, 7-9 p.m. for members, exhibit Sept. 21-Jan. 5, 2014

Admission: Free for members, $10 for nonmembers

366-6911, mocajacksonville.org

 

‘The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti’

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens celebrates the opening of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Community Sculpture Garden & Plaza with its inaugural exhibit. Permanent sculptures in the new space include William Zorach’s bronze “Spirit of the Dance.” The completion of the Olmsted Garden restoration is celebrated with live music, art-making activities and demonstrations.

Sculpture Garden Ponce de León Society opening and donor recognition 6-8 p.m. Sept. 20

Sculpture Garden community opening 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 21

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., …   More

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Congratulations to Arthur Moss for winning our drawing for two free VIP tickets to Folio Weekly’s Oktoberfest at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre Oct. 19. Moss was selected randomly from the readers who posted a perfect score in Folio Weekly’s Fall Arts Preview Quiz. Here are the answers to the quiz:

 

1. What year did The Beatles perform at the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville?

b. 1964

 

2. What was the first song Michael Jackson and his brothers performed on the first night (July 21, 1984) of the Victory Tour in Jacksonville?

b. “Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’”

 

3. Who was the judge who warned Elvis Presley to tone down his act after his first show at The Florida Theatre in 1956?

a. Marion Gooding

 

4. Who painted the jaguar mural on the Bostwick Building in Downtown Jacksonville in 1995?

d. Jim Draper

 

5. What was the name of the Egyptian exhibit that came to the Prime Osborn Convention Center in 1986?

b. “Ramses II: The Pharaoh in His Time”

 

6. What are the six colorful statues outside Veterans Memorial Arena called?

d. “Talking Continents”

 

7. The Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville was founded in 1924 as what organization?

c. Jacksonville Fine Arts Society

 

8. What is the most performed show in the history of Alhambra Theatre & Dining?

b. “Christmas Carole”

 

9. What is the full name for CEAM, Flagler College’s museum?

d. Crisp-Ellert Art Museum

 

10. What was the first Broadway show Artist Series brought to Jacksonville?

a. “Grease”

    More

PLAYING AROUND

“Toes in the water, ass in the sand. Not a worry in the world, a cold beer in my hand. Life is good today.” These vacation-lauding lyrics have found their liquid counterpart in LandShark’s island-style lager. Anheuser-Busch partnered with the Zac Brown Band to offer a series of limited-edition cans and accompanying exclusive video with band members.

The first can was released in May, the second in June and the third on Aug. 5. The three specialty cans are themed after the Zac Brown Band’s experiences. The first can celebrates pre-show routines, specifically the band’s “Eat & Greet” events. At these pre-concert Southern feasts, the band invites fans to join them in eating fried chicken. Guitars adorn the second can, which pays homage to the band’s performance. The third can’s design centers on the band’s post-show celebration.

This is not the first collaboration between the Zac Brown Band and LandShark Lager; the two have worked together for three years. LandShark brand manager Michael Lourie explained the cans are just one aspect of the partnership in an email. LandShark Lager is also sponsoring the Southern Ground Music and Food Festivals, which will feature the Zac Brown Band as the main act. The two-day festivals will be held in Nashville at the end of September and Charleston in mid-October. The festivals will include Kenny Chesney and Willie Nelson in Nashville and Band of Horses in Charleston. LandShark Lager is also a sponsor of the Zac Brown Band’s 2013 tour.

The Atlanta-based country band, created and led by vocalist Zac Brown, formed in 2002. Widespread national attention came when the band re-recorded and released their single “Chicken Fried” in 2008. Since then, the band has charted 10 hit singles, produced multiple platinum selling albums and toured all over the world.

Although many of their lyrics praise slowing down and enjoying a laid-back Southern lifestyle, the band has not had much time to sink their toes …   More

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University of North Florida sculpture professor Jenny Hager, musician and talent manager David “Brad” Lauretti, fine artist Joy Poulard-Leverette (aka Sister Feathertoe) and Neptune Beach playwright Ian Mairs were selected as inaugural Spark Grant recipients.

A privately raised pool of $61,000 will be split among the four projects to be implemented Oct. 1, 2013-Sept. 30, 2014, in the Spark District, according to a press release from the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville.

Hager’s project, “Art in Public Places,” will seek outdoor sculptures for lending from a national call to artists.

Lauretti’s “Jacksonville Songwriters’ Residency” program is designed to attract songwriters to live and perform in the Spark District — from Northbank Riverwalk to Duval Street, bordered on east and west by Liberty and Hogan streets.

Leverette’s “The Looking Lab: Art in Empty Storefronts” will use four downtown storefronts to feature art of various disciplines.

Mairs’ “Swamp Radio Jax” — a quarterly variety show of local art, culture and history — will broadcast live within the Spark District.

The grant recipients were selected in a process involving art and community leaders, the city of Jacksonville’s Art in Public Places Committee and the Cultural Council’s Board of Directors.   More

PLAYING AROUND

“Oh, my wandering eyes, nothing’s gonna take me by surprise I know, nothings gonna take me by surprise,” Kelsey Kopecky and Gabe Simon sing.

Starting with a bang, this “family” band consists of Kelsey Joy Kopecky (vocals, keyboard, bass), Gabe Simon (vocals, guitar, horns), Steven Holmes (guitar, lap steel guitar), David Krohn (drums), Markus Midkiff (cello, guitar, keyboards), and Corey Oxendine (bass, guitar, horns).

“Kids Raising Kids” is the band’s first full-length album after releasing three EPs — “Embraces,” “The Disaster” and “Of Epic Proportions,” between 2008 and 2010.

“Kids Raising Kids” opens up with “Wandering Eyes” as Kopecky and Simon catch your attention right away after a catchy guitar riff leads into their vocals.

Incorporating simple sounds like snapping fingers and whistling gives the band a down to earth feeling as “Heartbeat” opens with fingers snapping to an upbeat rhythm.

“I don’t know, no I don’t know what I can do for you,” Kopecky and Simon sing as clapping comes into the song.

All the sounds come together as the song continues with the full band jamming by the chorus.

Heavy drums begin “My Way,” as a softer guitar and keyboard comes in to join Kopecky’s gentle voice rolling on the beat.

The song picks up for the chorus however as Simon’s voice reaches its high pitch tone, singing “Why can’t you see it my way!” That's something reminiscent of the lead singer of indie pop band fun.

A smooth guitar riff starts “Are You Listening” as whistling is incorporated into the mix that will have you whistling along.

“Don’t be shy now my father said, if you’re honest, no one will complain or ask you are you listening,” Kopecky and Simon sing.

“Glow” begins in a similar fashion with a simple riff and gentle lyrics as the pace picks up toward the chorus.

The band shows its emotional side as “Change” is the halfway point of the …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Our special Fall Arts Preview issue comes out on Sept. 4. The season brings music, dance, theater, visual arts and more. To have your event considered for the preview, send the name of your event, the venue, its complete address, show dates and times, ticket prices, phone number, website, photos (with cutline and photo credit information) and contact information (phone number and email), in case we have any questions, to djohnson@folioweekly.com. The deadline for submissions is Aug. 5.   More

PLAYING AROUND

An art project that traveled from China, via Australia, to the West Coast of the U.S., has arrived in Jacksonville.

Collector Mike Cavendish acquired "The Unauthorized Collection of John Kaldor," which centers on a room-sized installation. The project was then transported to Jacksonville by artist David De Boer along with filmmaker Aaron Giesel, who chronicled the journey.

“It allowed them to have all these happenings with different Americans everyday,” Cavendish said. “They had a pop-up exhibition in Chicago. It was about a process of allowing a special work of art to pass through for all to see.”

Cavendish is a downtown attorney at Gunster Jacksonville and was thrilled to have these two artists, De Boer and Giesel, both of Southern California, spend 3 days in the city and meet with the art community.

The work was commissioned by FELT Space, a gallery in Australia, and created in China. De Boer wanted Kaldor’s collection to be made piece for piece in the same place Kaldor made his fortune.

The art project is considered to consist of three essential parts that made the process special — the installation, the journey and the film — Cavendish said.

“It’s the first time this has been done anywhere in the world,” Cavendish said. “Kaldor had a collection of world-class contemporary art he paid for by doing trade between China and Australia. It is provocative, highly original and was met with a great reception in Australia.”

Cavendish says that the installation confronts the way that the art market is aligning itself with the billionaires or the one-tenth of the 1 percent, taking art away from the masses.

De Boer’s work challenges that ideal by taking a highly renowned collector’s pieces and duplicating them.

Cavendish hopes to have the installation put up around Jacksonville to help promote Jacksonville as the next art hub, similar to Brooklyn or …   More

PLAYING AROUND

The heavy hitting sounds of SOJA came through to a massive crowd at Mavericks as The Movement and John Brown’s Body opened.

The Movement has gone through some member changes over the last year and a half as their lead singer removed himself from the group. However, the group still put on a great opening act.

John Brown’s Body kept the crowd dancing as their reggae/jam band influence laid the way for SOJA.

“Give it up for The Movement and John Brown’s Body,” Hemphill said. “We've been touring with these guys for like 5 or 10 years.”

SOJA came on with their horn section blasting to “Mentality,” a song that is meant to open up people’s thoughts to the world around them.

“We were the students but now we’re the ones who teach, we were the children who your lies we did believe. But we ain’t kids no more and we don’t need your speech,” lead singer Jacob Hemphill sang.

Following the first track off of their latest album “Strength to Survive,” SOJA went back to their hit single “I Don’t Wanna Wait” off of their 2009 album “Born in Babylon.”

The song expressing their views for better change in the country around them had the crowd’s hands going up and down with the beat.

“Moving forward to right now, a government that let you down, a racist leader no one trusts and an army that’s bigger than us,” Hemphill sang.

After playing “Decide You're Gone” the band followed with their acoustic track “She Still Loves Me,” however it was done in a much more upbeat tempo and the group did not hold back its enthusiasm.

Though experiencing technical difficulties during the first few songs, including mic feedback and guitar sound, the group continued on with the show.

The powerful album title song, “Strength To Survive,” drew multiple cheers as the band sang of the world’s condition.

Bobby Lee, bassist and vocals, dropped his sunglasses down for the song he originally wrote in the …   More

PLAYING AROUND

The Summer Musical Theatre Experience (SMTE) provides seventh graders to seniors in Northeast Florida with an opportunity to get hands-on acting experience performing in well-known plays such as “Hairspray!” and Disney’s "Beauty and the Beast.”

This year, the eighth-annual SMTE is performing the satire “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.” Folio Weekly caught up with 18-year-old J.D. Rees by phone to talk about his lead role in the production.

Folio Weekly: Can you tell us a little bit about the production?

J.D. Rees: It’s all about this character who goes by Finch, and that’s my role actually. He basically finds this book, the book on "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," and he reads it and goes step by step. Throughout the play you see how he’s able to get from the mailroom, bottom of the food chain, to the executive boardroom. It’s kind of just his steps on how he gets up the business ladder without actually trying.

F.W.: How long have you been doing this program?

Rees: This is a summer program, and this is my second year. I was in "Peter Pan" last year. My sister Rachael, she actually did it the year before that, and she was the one that got me interested in doing this summer program. I believe they did “Hairspray” that year. So yeah, this is my second year.

F.W.: What’s the atmosphere like during the program?

Rees: It’s really cool because we’re all high school based. That’s the cool thing about the program honestly, they’re able to take a bunch of high school students and really kind of change them and put them in a professional setting. They give us a set schedule and this amazing show and amazing stage, amazing everything honestly. Everyone is just so nice and everyone is so helpful, no one really puts anyone down. You just make a ton of brand new friendships.

F.W.: Was the Summer Musical Theater …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Not many were prepared for the buckets of rain that poured for more than three hours at the Sublime with Rome concert July 20 at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre. Many a beer was diluted as concertgoers made the dash from the concession area back to the cover of the amphitheater.

Despite the less-than-ideal concert conditions and unrelenting heat, fans were all smiles. The energy of the crowd was sky high when doors opened and swelled as the night drew closer to the hour when Sublime with Rome would take the stage. HB Surround Sound, Julian Marley and Pennywise got the night started and really put the crowd in an upbeat mood.

Sublime with Rome are on their summer tour with guests Pennywise and the Descendents.

The music and energy were on point for the night. Lead singer and guitarist Rome Ramirez, drummer Josh Freese and bassist Eric Wilson swaggered onto the stage to earsplitting excitement from the crowd. More than 3,500 voices rang out in answer to Rome Ramirez as he grabbed the mic and greeted adoring fans. 

"What's up, St. Augustine and Jacksonville! We're so happy to be back in Florida!" cried Rome before breaking into their first set. Beyond that, Sublime with Rome didn't do much to interact with the crowd, which could have added so much to an already supercharged and excited audience. 

Sublime with Rome played some of their newer songs, written after Rome joined the band, including "Panic" and "Take It or Leave It." They also played a lot of Sublime originals:  "Bad Fish," "Date Rape," "Smoke Two Joints," "Summer Time" and "April 29, 1992." Concertgoers were on their feet dancing and singing throughout the night, but they really went wild with each Sublime original.   More

 
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