Do you have something to share? Submit your stuff
Viewing 61 - 70 of 141
PLAYING AROUND

“Oh, my wandering eyes, nothing’s gonna take me by surprise I know, nothings gonna take me by surprise,” Kelsey Kopecky and Gabe Simon sing.

Starting with a bang, this “family” band consists of Kelsey Joy Kopecky (vocals, keyboard, bass), Gabe Simon (vocals, guitar, horns), Steven Holmes (guitar, lap steel guitar), David Krohn (drums), Markus Midkiff (cello, guitar, keyboards), and Corey Oxendine (bass, guitar, horns).

“Kids Raising Kids” is the band’s first full-length album after releasing three EPs — “Embraces,” “The Disaster” and “Of Epic Proportions,” between 2008 and 2010.

“Kids Raising Kids” opens up with “Wandering Eyes” as Kopecky and Simon catch your attention right away after a catchy guitar riff leads into their vocals.

Incorporating simple sounds like snapping fingers and whistling gives the band a down to earth feeling as “Heartbeat” opens with fingers snapping to an upbeat rhythm.

“I don’t know, no I don’t know what I can do for you,” Kopecky and Simon sing as clapping comes into the song.

All the sounds come together as the song continues with the full band jamming by the chorus.

Heavy drums begin “My Way,” as a softer guitar and keyboard comes in to join Kopecky’s gentle voice rolling on the beat.

The song picks up for the chorus however as Simon’s voice reaches its high pitch tone, singing “Why can’t you see it my way!” That's something reminiscent of the lead singer of indie pop band fun.

A smooth guitar riff starts “Are You Listening” as whistling is incorporated into the mix that will have you whistling along.

“Don’t be shy now my father said, if you’re honest, no one will complain or ask you are you listening,” Kopecky and Simon sing.

“Glow” begins in a similar fashion with a simple riff and gentle lyrics as the pace picks up toward the chorus.

The band shows its emotional side as “Change” is the halfway point of the …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Our special Fall Arts Preview issue comes out on Sept. 4. The season brings music, dance, theater, visual arts and more. To have your event considered for the preview, send the name of your event, the venue, its complete address, show dates and times, ticket prices, phone number, website, photos (with cutline and photo credit information) and contact information (phone number and email), in case we have any questions, to djohnson@folioweekly.com. The deadline for submissions is Aug. 5.   More

PLAYING AROUND

An art project that traveled from China, via Australia, to the West Coast of the U.S., has arrived in Jacksonville.

Collector Mike Cavendish acquired "The Unauthorized Collection of John Kaldor," which centers on a room-sized installation. The project was then transported to Jacksonville by artist David De Boer along with filmmaker Aaron Giesel, who chronicled the journey.

“It allowed them to have all these happenings with different Americans everyday,” Cavendish said. “They had a pop-up exhibition in Chicago. It was about a process of allowing a special work of art to pass through for all to see.”

Cavendish is a downtown attorney at Gunster Jacksonville and was thrilled to have these two artists, De Boer and Giesel, both of Southern California, spend 3 days in the city and meet with the art community.

The work was commissioned by FELT Space, a gallery in Australia, and created in China. De Boer wanted Kaldor’s collection to be made piece for piece in the same place Kaldor made his fortune.

The art project is considered to consist of three essential parts that made the process special — the installation, the journey and the film — Cavendish said.

“It’s the first time this has been done anywhere in the world,” Cavendish said. “Kaldor had a collection of world-class contemporary art he paid for by doing trade between China and Australia. It is provocative, highly original and was met with a great reception in Australia.”

Cavendish says that the installation confronts the way that the art market is aligning itself with the billionaires or the one-tenth of the 1 percent, taking art away from the masses.

De Boer’s work challenges that ideal by taking a highly renowned collector’s pieces and duplicating them.

Cavendish hopes to have the installation put up around Jacksonville to help promote Jacksonville as the next art hub, similar to Brooklyn or …   More

PLAYING AROUND

The heavy hitting sounds of SOJA came through to a massive crowd at Mavericks as The Movement and John Brown’s Body opened.

The Movement has gone through some member changes over the last year and a half as their lead singer removed himself from the group. However, the group still put on a great opening act.

John Brown’s Body kept the crowd dancing as their reggae/jam band influence laid the way for SOJA.

“Give it up for The Movement and John Brown’s Body,” Hemphill said. “We've been touring with these guys for like 5 or 10 years.”

SOJA came on with their horn section blasting to “Mentality,” a song that is meant to open up people’s thoughts to the world around them.

“We were the students but now we’re the ones who teach, we were the children who your lies we did believe. But we ain’t kids no more and we don’t need your speech,” lead singer Jacob Hemphill sang.

Following the first track off of their latest album “Strength to Survive,” SOJA went back to their hit single “I Don’t Wanna Wait” off of their 2009 album “Born in Babylon.”

The song expressing their views for better change in the country around them had the crowd’s hands going up and down with the beat.

“Moving forward to right now, a government that let you down, a racist leader no one trusts and an army that’s bigger than us,” Hemphill sang.

After playing “Decide You're Gone” the band followed with their acoustic track “She Still Loves Me,” however it was done in a much more upbeat tempo and the group did not hold back its enthusiasm.

Though experiencing technical difficulties during the first few songs, including mic feedback and guitar sound, the group continued on with the show.

The powerful album title song, “Strength To Survive,” drew multiple cheers as the band sang of the world’s condition.

Bobby Lee, bassist and vocals, dropped his sunglasses down for the song he originally wrote in the …   More

PLAYING AROUND

The Summer Musical Theatre Experience (SMTE) provides seventh graders to seniors in Northeast Florida with an opportunity to get hands-on acting experience performing in well-known plays such as “Hairspray!” and Disney’s "Beauty and the Beast.”

This year, the eighth-annual SMTE is performing the satire “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.” Folio Weekly caught up with 18-year-old J.D. Rees by phone to talk about his lead role in the production.

Folio Weekly: Can you tell us a little bit about the production?

J.D. Rees: It’s all about this character who goes by Finch, and that’s my role actually. He basically finds this book, the book on "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," and he reads it and goes step by step. Throughout the play you see how he’s able to get from the mailroom, bottom of the food chain, to the executive boardroom. It’s kind of just his steps on how he gets up the business ladder without actually trying.

F.W.: How long have you been doing this program?

Rees: This is a summer program, and this is my second year. I was in "Peter Pan" last year. My sister Rachael, she actually did it the year before that, and she was the one that got me interested in doing this summer program. I believe they did “Hairspray” that year. So yeah, this is my second year.

F.W.: What’s the atmosphere like during the program?

Rees: It’s really cool because we’re all high school based. That’s the cool thing about the program honestly, they’re able to take a bunch of high school students and really kind of change them and put them in a professional setting. They give us a set schedule and this amazing show and amazing stage, amazing everything honestly. Everyone is just so nice and everyone is so helpful, no one really puts anyone down. You just make a ton of brand new friendships.

F.W.: Was the Summer Musical Theater …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Not many were prepared for the buckets of rain that poured for more than three hours at the Sublime with Rome concert July 20 at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre. Many a beer was diluted as concertgoers made the dash from the concession area back to the cover of the amphitheater.

Despite the less-than-ideal concert conditions and unrelenting heat, fans were all smiles. The energy of the crowd was sky high when doors opened and swelled as the night drew closer to the hour when Sublime with Rome would take the stage. HB Surround Sound, Julian Marley and Pennywise got the night started and really put the crowd in an upbeat mood.

Sublime with Rome are on their summer tour with guests Pennywise and the Descendents.

The music and energy were on point for the night. Lead singer and guitarist Rome Ramirez, drummer Josh Freese and bassist Eric Wilson swaggered onto the stage to earsplitting excitement from the crowd. More than 3,500 voices rang out in answer to Rome Ramirez as he grabbed the mic and greeted adoring fans. 

"What's up, St. Augustine and Jacksonville! We're so happy to be back in Florida!" cried Rome before breaking into their first set. Beyond that, Sublime with Rome didn't do much to interact with the crowd, which could have added so much to an already supercharged and excited audience. 

Sublime with Rome played some of their newer songs, written after Rome joined the band, including "Panic" and "Take It or Leave It." They also played a lot of Sublime originals:  "Bad Fish," "Date Rape," "Smoke Two Joints," "Summer Time" and "April 29, 1992." Concertgoers were on their feet dancing and singing throughout the night, but they really went wild with each Sublime original.   More

PLAYING AROUND

Pacific Dub In Jacksonville: Take Two

West Coasters Pacific Dub brought their trademark energy and charisma back to Jacksonville on July 17 as they started the Florida leg of their "Red, White and Booze Tour" at Jack Rabbits.

One of the band's most meaningful and well known songs, "Dreaming," kicked off the show.

“I’m dreaming, I’m dreaming of a place so far away, yes somewhere we can take our great escape,” lead singer Colton Place sang to the crowd, who quickly showed their appreciation.

Openers Prime Trees and Sidereal set the reggae/rock feel that Pacific Dub personifies as the crowd swayed to the melodies.

After rocking out to “Close To You,” Pacific Dub played an original song “Best of All Time,” one they re-mastered for their latest album “Tightrope.”

“You with us Jax?” asked guitarist Bryce Klemer as the crowd responded with yelps and applause.

Lead singer Place asked the crowd if it was okay for drummer David Delaney to take over the mic for a few songs, prompting more yells of approval.

Playing “Young Girl” and an old favorite, “Foolin’ Around,” Delaney held his own vocally while playing the drums simultaneously.

Both the bassist, Ryan Naglich, and keyboard player Casey Eubanks clearly enjoyed the crowd’s energy as they played with smiles on their faces.

After playing the album's title song “Tightrope,” the group followed with a crowd favorite “California Girl” that had the audience swaying to the smooth reggae melody.

The band's enjoyment of the show was clear as guitarist Klemer raised his beer to the crowd and asked they drink for the lead singer who could not partake.

“Can’t drink while I’m taking these steroids,” Place said, flexing his muscles.

The singer announced that problems with his vocal cords may keep him out for a few months after the end of …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Symbiote Spider-Man and Wonder Woman are talking in the corner. Zelda and a Stormtrooper are posing for pictures.

Worlds collided as fans enjoyed playing as their favorite characters, straight out of comic books, video games and fantasy July 13 at the Legend of GAAM at The Museum.

The Games, Art and Music event included a art sale benefiting Child's Play, a charity dedicated to improving the lives of children in hospitals with toys and games.

The event also included a cosplay contest for those dressed in character, a magic show in the "Lost Woods," a dance contest in Ganon's Dungeon and a DJ playing many memorable tunes from video-game classics as well as live music from On Guard. Nevado Arts put on a martial arts demonstration, while vendors offered prizes.  

A photobooth designed to mirror the world of Zelda greeted you on your way in. Many took pictures posing in their Zelda-inspired costumes and props.  

A gaming room with more 20 TVs and other consoles throughout The Museum invited gamers to plug in. 

The first GAAM event was themed on the "Street Fighter" series and also included a 3D lifesize Mario game outside The Museum. That event drew about 350 people in December.

The Legend of GAAM sold out with more than 600 enthusiasts enjoying "The Legend of Zelda" theme, including the Triforce, rupees, health hearts and a three-leveled Zelda walk-through with the Night Sky, Fairy Cave, Lost Woods, and Ganon's Dungeon.

GAAM founders Ryan Thompson, Derrick Nevado, Logan Zawacki and Edmund Dansart created the events to bring awareness to the gaming industry in Jacksonville and help strengthen it.

Thompson originally made fan art for the 25th anniversary of "Street Fighter" and put it on Tumblr. He received a strong response and realized he wanted to do something even bigger. Then, he met Nevado, Zawacki and Dansart and GAAM was born.    More

PLAYING AROUND

A five-panel mural, featuring Elvis Presley, Ray Charles and other local musicians, created by a group of First Coast High School students, has been installed in Downtown Jacksonville across from the Florida Theatre.

The mural was produced by 25 students in the Behavioral Education and Social Skills Teaching program.

The program is for students who have emotional and behavior difficulties and have been removed from regular classrooms.

The students and five staff members spent eight weeks in art classes planning and creating the mural. It was installed July 11 outside Dos Gatos, which is across the street from the Florida Theatre.

The project was led by Kendall Barsin, Florida Theatre director of marketing and Cathedral Arts Project teacher Laurie Brown.   More

PLAYING AROUND

Jacksonville International Airport has become an extension of an ever-growing and developing art scene with its 14 permanent installations and two galleries.

This month's exhibit features the work of Amy Cheng, who last week created and installed the mosaic mural, "Celestial Playground." 

The mural is made of glass, ceramic, and stone mosaic, with gold flowers made of brass. The "Celestial Playground" adorns the walls between the Sky and Haskell galleries. The brightness and colorfulness of the mural and its cosmic, sky and space influences were desiged by Cheng to make the viewer feel less stressed about the challenges of air travel such as security and flight delays.

"'Celestial Playground' was inspired by space and the sky — it is an airport — and the floor was blue so I mimiced that.  The piece is designed to give the viewer a sense of lightness, of joy,” Cheng said. “I wanted to give the travellers and facility something visually lovely and cheerful.”

Cheng, an artist in New York, was commissioned to complete her mural after competing with more than 90 other applicants.

    More

 
Download our dojax app
What do you think? Browse
Who is Northeast Florida's 'Best Righteous Crusader' and why?
Best of Jax ballot released on July 30 will ask this question and many others