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An art project that traveled from China, via Australia, to the West Coast of the U.S., has arrived in Jacksonville.

Collector Mike Cavendish acquired "The Unauthorized Collection of John Kaldor," which centers on a room-sized installation. The project was then transported to Jacksonville by artist David De Boer along with filmmaker Aaron Giesel, who chronicled the journey.

“It allowed them to have all these happenings with different Americans everyday,” Cavendish said. “They had a pop-up exhibition in Chicago. It was about a process of allowing a special work of art to pass through for all to see.”

Cavendish is a downtown attorney at Gunster Jacksonville and was thrilled to have these two artists, De Boer and Giesel, both of Southern California, spend 3 days in the city and meet with the art community.

The work was commissioned by FELT Space, a gallery in Australia, and created in China. De Boer wanted Kaldor’s collection to be made piece for piece in the same place Kaldor made his fortune.

The art project is considered to consist of three essential parts that made the process special — the installation, the journey and the film — Cavendish said.

“It’s the first time this has been done anywhere in the world,” Cavendish said. “Kaldor had a collection of world-class contemporary art he paid for by doing trade between China and Australia. It is provocative, highly original and was met with a great reception in Australia.”

Cavendish says that the installation confronts the way that the art market is aligning itself with the billionaires or the one-tenth of the 1 percent, taking art away from the masses.

De Boer’s work challenges that ideal by taking a highly renowned collector’s pieces and duplicating them.

Cavendish hopes to have the installation put up around Jacksonville to help promote Jacksonville as the next art hub, similar to Brooklyn or …   More

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A film written by a Jacksonville resident will screen in the same theater where the Oscars are handed out in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Best Friends Films’ “The Other Half,” written by Jacksonville’s Sharon Y. Cobb, received runner-up honors and $1,000 in cash and prizes in the 48 Go Green International Film Competition.

The short film will screen with other winners on April 19, about two months after Hollywood stars pick up their Oscars Feb. 24, at The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.

In the Go Green film competition filmmakers must create the concept, write the script, cast, film and edit the film all within the 48-hour time limit.

“The Other Half” is about Albert Smith, a young man searching for the girl in a torn photograph he discovered. Meanwhile, Lark Green is trying to teach the world ways to save the environment, but no one will give her the time of day. She seeks a boy in torn photo, because she believes he will help her save the world.

Cobb, a member of the Writers Guild of America, is also director of the University of North Florida Writers Conference and teaches literature classes at UNF. She also created the comedy website FunnyFixx.com and produces the web series “Thurapy.”

Best Friends Films, led by producer/director Marc Boese, had their film “Way Off the Grid” selected among the top-rated films for the 2011 competition.   More

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In the past few years, reality shows have taken over television. With every channel change comes a different version of what “reality” is.

Luckily for Jacksonville, reality is pretty sweet.  

Sweet Pete’s, a natural canning and sweet treat shop located in the historic district of Springfield, will now be known for more than its delicious candies. CW 17 has decided to make a show called, "Sweet Pete’s: The Show." It will highlight the in and outs and ups and downs of building a small business, all while maintaining the entertainment factor with a colorful cast.

Pete Behringer, son of Peterbrooke Chocolatier’s founders and co-owner of Sweet Pete’s, said he owes the recent deal with CW 17 to another local show.

“We were featured on a local show over here in Jacksonville, and the executive producer spent the day … with us and she liked what we were doing and thought, ‘We need to have cameras over here in this place because you people are crazy.’ … The rest is history,” he said.

For most people, having cameras following them around would put them in a frenzy; constantly worrying about how their hair looked, if there was anything in their teeth or what mom would think. But for Behringer and the cast, it became part of their everyday life.

“At first, it’s very strange. It’s a very strange sensation. But it’s not long before that feeling goes away, and you’re just doing your business, you’re going about your daily routine, you’re not really thinking about it, at least, I wasn’t. … I think [for] most of the people here, it just got to be natural,” Behringer said.

So who are “the people?” The cast is made up of co-owners and spouses, Peter and Allison Behringer; business partner Dane Baird; candymaker Demetric Nathan; shop manager Ericka Woods and decorator Christopher Cahill.

Each of these characters …   More

PLAYING AROUND

It might not feel like fall in Northeast Florida yet, but the fall arts season is in full swing. This is one busy weekend for visual arts, with several major openings.

 

‘Paint Techtonics’

New York painter Leslie Wayne’s exhibit of abstract art created by building layers of oil paint into 3-D compositions opens J. Johnson Gallery's season. You have never seen paintings like these. The paint is sculpted, scraped, cut and combined to create works evocative of geological and oceanographic forms.

Reception 6-8 p.m. Sept. 20, exhibit continues through Nov. 1

J. Johnson Gallery, 177 Fourth Ave. N., Jacksonville Beach

435-3200, jjohnsongallery.com

 

‘Abstraction Over Time: The Paintings of Michael Goldberg’

The Museum of Contemporary Arts Jacksonville mounts the first retrospective exhibit to encompass the entire span of Michael Goldberg's career. Goldberg was an abstract expressionist who discussed art and studied with Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline. Goldberg died in 2008, but his wife, the artist Lynn Umlauf, will attend the opening.

Reception 6 p.m. Sept. 20 for patrons, 7-9 p.m. for members, exhibit Sept. 21-Jan. 5, 2014

Admission: Free for members, $10 for nonmembers

366-6911, mocajacksonville.org

 

‘The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti’

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens celebrates the opening of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Community Sculpture Garden & Plaza with its inaugural exhibit. Permanent sculptures in the new space include William Zorach’s bronze “Spirit of the Dance.” The completion of the Olmsted Garden restoration is celebrated with live music, art-making activities and demonstrations.

Sculpture Garden Ponce de León Society opening and donor recognition 6-8 p.m. Sept. 20

Sculpture Garden community opening 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 21

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., …   More

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The Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville announced the selection of Kim Bergeron as its new executive director, according to a press release Oct. 1.

Bergeron is expected to start Nov. 1, replacing Robert Arleigh White, who retired after 13 years as executive director.

Bergeron was the director of Cultural and Public Affairs in Slidell, La. In November 2012, she chose to resign from her post rather than select one of two other employees to be laid off, according to a story in the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

In Slidell, Bergeron spearheaded fundraising efforts for programming and worked with the New Orleans Museum of Art to bring in exhibits that included art by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and Andy Warhol, according to the Cultural Council.

Bergeron was the unanimous choice of a search committee made up of Cultural Council board members and community representatives.

"The committee was wowed by all Kim has achieved in her previous roles," Cultural Council board member Abel Harding said, according to the news release.   More

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The PRI 48-Hour Film Project screens the best films as decided by the judges at 7 p.m. July 13 at the Florida Theatre.

“Pushover” by Dads has a chance for a sweep as the film is nominated in all categories, including best film.

Joining “Pushover” in the best film category is “One & Change” by Mad Cowford and “Goodnight” by Best Friends. The three Best Film nominees are also nominated for best direction.

Both “One & Change” and “Goodnight” won an audience award for their respective screenings in Group A and Group C.

Best writing nominees include “The Philosophy of Psychology Series Video No. 24 "Romance” by Yeeaarrhh, “Pushover” and “Goodnight.”

“One & Change” and “Pushover” join “Sisterhood” by Ruby Red Productions with nominations in best cinematography.

Rounding out the nominations are the big three in “Pushover,” “One & Change” and “Goodnight” for Best Sound Design.

Other awards to be given out include best actor and best actress, best ensemble cast. Tickets to the screening are $10.

All of the films entered were viewed by judges and the nominees have been decided. The winners will go on to represent Jacksonville at Filmapalooza and be up for Best 48 HFP Film of 2013.

Each movie had to be written, shot, edited and scored in 48 hours to enter.   More

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If metal’s “golden age” of macabre on-stage personas, outlaw getup and pyrotechnic extravaganza has passed, Avenged Sevenfold resuscitated its charm on April 26 at Welcome to Rockville.

Preparing for last performance of the day, those who hadn’t succumbed to a beer- and funnel cake-induced coma on the littered grounds made their way over to witness the metal mainstays. Well before the band’s set time, the audience had accumulated past the stage-light tower, nearly 150 yards from the stage barricade.

Ears perked up and quiet anticipation turned to cheering as the first burly, Sabbath-inspired riff of “Shepherd of Fire” pummeled out over the audience. Sevenfold took the stage and delivered an unrelenting sonic assault for the duration of its near 90-minute performance.

The audience was going to get their money’s worth, like it or not.

“We’re on a strict curfew, and we don’t want this to get canceled for next year,” vocalist M. Shadows said in a very brief lull between guitar solos and fireballs. “So, let’s just play another song before I chit-chat our way to the curfew.”

The statue of a skull king sitting on a throne of skulls holding a skull scepter watching over the proceedings was a bit much. But that’s the point. In case you were standing at a far distance from the stage, the camera crew would make a dramatic cut to it every few minutes.

Their live performance sounds tighter than ever. Synyster Gates effortlessly rips solos out his custom Schecter guitar with a disinterested, bored expression that only adds to his charm.

Sometimes, guitar solos can feel like an indulgence of the guitarist, while the audience and the rest of the band wait for the next verse. That feeling doesn’t come into Synyster’s playing; the solos feel like an organic part of the song. And the guy has got style, bending a note with one hand and flipping the bird with the other. The crowd ate it up.

M. Shadows showed impressive …   More

PLAYING AROUND

The posh, velvet seats and ribbed halls of the Florida Theatre might not have seemed like the ideal setting for stoner-rock quintet Queens of the Stone Age Feb. 3. Tufts of beard with residue of cheap ale hung plentifully over tattooed throats and secondhand shirts as fans crowded into carpeted aisles, anticipation and unextinguished tobacco palpable in the air.

When a 60-second countdown led into the simmering, adrenaline-drenched riff of “You Think I Ain’t Worth a Dollar, But I Feel Like a Millionaire,” it was clear the once-assigned seats would serve no further purpose.

The top balcony stood and gathered at the rails. Hands and fists and drinks raised into the air. Queens of the Stone Age had a rock and roll show on their hands.

And that’s just where they wanted it. There’s no smoke and mirrors to the band’s stage presence — it’s hard-hitting drums, overdriven guitars and plain, old-fashioned style. They used stop-and-go rhythms often to keep listeners on their toes, waiting for applause to start before pummeling the audience with an additional few measures.

The theater screen behind the band showed images that might not surprise you — but ones you could never really predict — from stoner rock, including a crow pecking the gizzards out of a bandaged man and bare-breasted ladies with exploding planets for faces. The theatrics helped set the tone, but most of the audience’s focus fell on singer Josh Homme’s tequila-lubed dance grooves and loose guitar playing; both only got groovier and looser as the over two-hour set wore on.

Much of Homme’s charm seems to come from being one with the crowd. He’s accessible. He takes drags from his cigarette and croons a verse on the exhale. When he drops his guitar pick, he just squats down and picks it up. He has a one-sided chat with an audience member about penis length between songs, outstretching his arm as means of reference.

After security pulled a fan out of the show, …   More

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Indie folk project Whetherman begins a Kickstarter fundraising project Feb. 10, with a goal of $13,500 to send the trio on its first European tour.

Founded by Nicholas Williams in 2007, Whetherman has independently released five full-length studio albums and embarked on three nationwide tours. The grassroots project has recently been placed on Pandora Radio and featured in Relix Magazine as an “Artist on the Rise.”

“Songs and Whispers,” an artist development network based in Bremen Germany, has already booked the tour and recently invited Whetherman to join the 25-day May/June circuit of shows between Germany and Denmark. The shows are all booked and ready, and the band just needs to get across the pond.

Funds raised will go toward travel and living expenses for the band, in addition to new merchandise for the tour. Any funds raised above the goal will go toward funding Whetherman’s sixth record, “Seeds for Harvest,” scheduled for release in winter 2014.

Incentives and goodies for donating funds range from digital downloads of the band’s latest songs and albums to artwork, jewelry and merchandise from the band to an intimate show at your house during their fall 2014 tour and two-year VIP show treatment.   More

PLAYING AROUND

Open mic has a proud tradition in Jacksonville dating back a couple of decades — and then some. I emceed nights at Fusion Café and Fuel in the 1990s, and, of course ,Al Letson (who has gone on to accomplish as much as any writer of his generation) had his night at Voodoo years ago.

To borrow a phrase from Sonny and Cher, the beat goes on, in the form of the Cypher Open Mic Poetry and Soul, held at Da Real Ting Café every first, third, and fifth Thursday of the month. Hosted by DJ Monsta and Ill Clinton — names familiar to those who know what's happening in Duval — this is a showcase for talent and is worth checking out.

Doors open at 8 p.m., and the show starts at 9 p.m. The show ends at midnight. Entry is $5 all night long, 18 and older. There is a full dinner menu, and for those who need liquid fortification, there are 3-for-1 well drinks, which is a drink offer that no reasonable person can refuse.

On April 4, the WB will be in the house, recording the event for a local program. The smart performer would show up tomorrow, do a poem or a song, then bring it back in April for the cameras.   More

 
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