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PLAYING AROUND

Three years ago, Dead Tank Records closed its doors and Josh Jubinsky began focusing on his highest priority: family.

“Selling records at shows, touring with a band or trying to operate a store and job at the same time,” Jubinsky said in an email interview. He felt he could not properly put family as his top priority.

Working at the Main Library in the children’s department for almost 10 years now, Jubinsky says, “it’s very helpful to have a steady job and a great place to work. I’m really lucky in that regard.”

Now, Jubinsky and Dead Tank are back with upcoming releases are already in the works. A 7” split involving musicians Captive Bolt and author Gary Francione is nearly complete as the B-side is already available on their site deadtankrecords.wordpress.com. “It should be out in June,” Jubinsky said.

With the hiatus set in motion as his daughter was born, passions were shifted for Jubinsky. “As far as ‘true passions’ go, I’d say raising my daughter takes the cake.” However, music is still very important to Jubinsky as he wants to impress that upon his growing child.

Also in the works, Emperor X will be set to release a record after his return from Europe, where he is currently touring. “Right now, we’re still ironing out the details for the record, and actually he’s very busy having a great time on tour in Europe.”

Family man, record producer and a builder of his own furniture, Jubinsky looks to create that perfect balance where family is his No. 1 priority as he continues his grand music endeavors.   More

PLAYING AROUND

The St. Johns Cultural Council honors women in the community for making significant contributions in the arts with its fifth annual Recognizing Outstanding Women in the Arts (ROWITA) ceremony at 6 p.m. March 10 in the Black Box of the Limelight Theatre in St. Augustine.

These women will be honored and recognized during the program followed by a reception. The keynote speaker is Jean Rahner, co-founder of Limelight. The 2013 winners are Diane Bradley, Debbie McDade, Patti Rang, Mary Siess and Wendy Tatter.

Bradley is an educator of the arts and a visual artist who is passionate about youth involvement in the art world. For the past eight years, Bradley has jointly presented the Annual All-County High School and Middle School Arts Show alongside the St. Johns County Schools. Bradley also led to the creation of the annual Tactile Show for the blind and visually impaired, which is now in its 12th year. Bradley continues to donate her time and efforts to the St. Augustine Art Association by managing their biggest fundraiser, the annual Spring and Fall Art and Craft Festivals and the Nature and Wildlife Exhibition.

McDade is a jazz singer who went to New York as a teenager to pursue her career. McDade is listed in the Encyclopedia of Jazz, and she adopted the stage name Debby Moore, which was given to her by Louis Armstrong. McDade released her record, My Kind of Blues in 1959. McDade sang alongside American jazz pianist Earl “Fatha” Hines and has also starred in movies while working in Japan. McDade is active in community efforts, while serving a board member of Excelsior Museum and Cultural Center and the Foot Soldiers Memorial Project.

Rang has been a cultural advocate and re-enactor in the creation and organization of events to celebrate the colonial life of St. Augustine for more than 30 years. She is a leader and contributing member of the East Florida Rangers and the 60th Regiment of Foot in local and regional events. Rang wrote a cookbook …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Not many were prepared for the buckets of rain that poured for more than three hours at the Sublime with Rome concert July 20 at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre. Many a beer was diluted as concertgoers made the dash from the concession area back to the cover of the amphitheater.

Despite the less-than-ideal concert conditions and unrelenting heat, fans were all smiles. The energy of the crowd was sky high when doors opened and swelled as the night drew closer to the hour when Sublime with Rome would take the stage. HB Surround Sound, Julian Marley and Pennywise got the night started and really put the crowd in an upbeat mood.

Sublime with Rome are on their summer tour with guests Pennywise and the Descendents.

The music and energy were on point for the night. Lead singer and guitarist Rome Ramirez, drummer Josh Freese and bassist Eric Wilson swaggered onto the stage to earsplitting excitement from the crowd. More than 3,500 voices rang out in answer to Rome Ramirez as he grabbed the mic and greeted adoring fans. 

"What's up, St. Augustine and Jacksonville! We're so happy to be back in Florida!" cried Rome before breaking into their first set. Beyond that, Sublime with Rome didn't do much to interact with the crowd, which could have added so much to an already supercharged and excited audience. 

Sublime with Rome played some of their newer songs, written after Rome joined the band, including "Panic" and "Take It or Leave It." They also played a lot of Sublime originals:  "Bad Fish," "Date Rape," "Smoke Two Joints," "Summer Time" and "April 29, 1992." Concertgoers were on their feet dancing and singing throughout the night, but they really went wild with each Sublime original.   More

THE FLOG

Since October 1964, Jones College Radio has transmitted the increasingly surreal genre known as "beautiful music" throughout the Jacksonville area. This category is diverse to the point of seeming inchoate to those who are not aficionados. "Beautiful music" can be anything from the lush sounds of the Jackie Gleason and Mystic Moods Orchestras to the American classic sounds of the Ray Conniff Singers and 101 Strings. If you listen to Jones College Radio for long enough, you may even hear music from the benighted 21st century -- "Don't Know Why," the slice of heaven from the coquettish chanteuse Norah Jones, was on there one recent evening.

Those who have lived in Jacksonville for decades likely have found themselves scanning past the station on their way to the nihilist nothingness offered by the corporate rock and rap stations. But if you've ever found yourself needing more than the amorphous rebellion clear channel has to offer, true anarchy and rebellion can be found on Jones College Radio, where forgotten groups like the Anita Kerr Singers perform willfully anodyne covers of harder rocking songs … like "Love Will Keep Us Together" by Captain & Tenneille. 

Despite the station's willful ignorance -- and thank God for it -- of the twerking and blinging of the modern era, the station has done well in the ratings. The station's website at wktz.jones.edu/ claims that the station is in the top 5 with the 35+ set. Despite this consistent ratings success, however, problems have been looming with the station's finances this fall.

A recent spot on the station, played maybe once an hour or so, laid the case out plainly in Jones College Radio's first attempt at a pledge drive in recent memory. The station is still popular, yet many of those who listen to it do not support it financially. If Jones College Radio does not raise $200k in the next couple of months, the future of beautiful music in Jacksonville -- and most of the rest of the …   More

PLAYING AROUND

In the celebration of the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s arrival in St. Augustine, Cathedral Arts Projects students will perform their interpretations of what it’s like to live in Florida — April 27 and 28 at the University of North Florida’s Lazzara Performance Hall.

CAP presents its annual production with the theme “Viva Florida” as Northeast Florida students showcase their talents in theater, ballet, step, ballroom dance, African dance, violin, ukulele, percussion and chorus.

The young performers’ creativity has stemmed through their own exploration of Florida’s history and natural beauty, said the Rev. Kimberly Hyatt, executive director of the Cathedral Arts, in a press release.

Performances are scheduled for 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. April 27 and 2 p.m. April 28 at the Lazzara Performance Hall. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door.

CAP is the largest free afterschool program in Duval County for students participating in the performing arts. CAP is funded in part by The City of Jacksonville; Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville; State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs; the Florida Council on Arts and Culture; and the National Endowment for the Arts, according to CAP.   More

PLAYING AROUND

Life was good for Orlando business owner Dan Ellis in the spring of 2009. He had a wonderful marriage, three happy children and a successful printing business. But by that fall, he’d begun to slur words and suspected something was seriously wrong with his health. Ellis was diagnosed with progressive ALS, a debilitating terminal illness also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, in 2010.

The 18-minute short documentary film, “Dan Behind His Eyes,” chronicles Ellis’ time spent creating giant paintings with his daughter Gina in 2011, by which time he had lost nearly all muscle control and could only communicate using a Dynavox eye movement sensor. The film will premiere at the World Arts Film Festival at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville on April 11.

“I wanted to use art and music and color. Dan surrounded himself with art, and that’s who he was,” said Sheri Kebbel, the film’s director and producer. “So this film, I wanted it to be so that people would not look away. That it was not so ugly and so hard in knowing that it was a terminal illness to where they have this feeling of ‘Well, what do you want me to do about it?’”

Kebbel filmed the Ellis family from November 2010 until March 2012, just a few months before Dan Ellis lost his battle with ALS last June. In addition to the short documentary “Dan Behind His Eyes,” Kebbel directed and produced an hour-long, feature-length film which follows Ellis’ interactions with family and friends and his artistic collaborations with his children and hip-hop rapper MC Serch while in the grip of progressive ALS. The feature film is currently in post-production and will be submitted to film festivals in the fall.

Kebbel will join Kevin Boylan, medical director and founder of the ALS clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida, and Kim Hanna, president and CEO of the ALS Association Florida Chapter, for a short question and …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Whether you want to sing a pirate tune with your mateys or enjoy some light-hearted comedy, the Colonial Crew Revue has a little something for everyone.

The variety show written by Scott "Grimm" Abrams takes place at St. Augustine’s Colonial Quarter every Friday and Saturday night. The versatile Picolata Players perform a musical based on the days when pirates still roamed the streets.

Although suitable for families, the show includes themes and innuendo for a pirate experience adults can enjoy as well. Unlimited refills of beer, sangria and wine are included for adults 21 and older.

The singing was great and each of the characters had different singing styles, but they all mixed together well. The character named El Comico, who was the goofy and funny heart-breaker, was chased around the stage and tripped over himself as scripted, yet sang perfectly the entire time.

The show got even better when Mayhem de Magnifico, the drunk and multi-talented trickster, awoke and started performing impressive magic tricks. The cast was very talented in many different aspects and it showed.

Easily the best part of the show was the audience interaction. The characters walked into the crowd almost every scene to have viewers add to the show and even join them on the stage at one point. The scene where Don Ramon Bellagrande and his “lovely wife” use the audience to tell the story of how they met would make anyone laugh.

Unfortunately, near the end of the June 21 show, it started pouring rain mercilessly. Some people left, but a surprisingly large amount of people, many without umbrellas, stayed to watch the end. The characters started throwing puns about rain into the show, which was obviously improvised. I thought that was wonderfully done and it let the audience know the actors and actresses recognized the sacrifice they were making to see the end of the show.

After the show, the cast members waited at the nearby Taberna del Caballo …   More

PLAYING AROUND

A near-capacity crowd filed into the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts Oct. 18 hungry for the catchy pop hits and glittery costumes of "Mamma Mia!"

Before the curtain rose, one woman leaned over and whispered, “I’m sorry if my singing along annoys you.”

No one could be annoyed with dancing in the aisles, superb singing and touching mother-daughter moments in the high-energy musical.

"Mamma Mia!" — playing for two more shows Oct. 19 in Downtown Jacksonville — soars on hits by the Swedish group ABBA and the story of reuniting fragments of a shattered past during a wedding in paradise.

Bride-to-be Sophie, played by Chelsea Williams, dreams of having the father she never knew walk her down the aisle. Setting the chaos in motion, Sophie reads her mother's diary and writes to three men — believing one is her dad. All three men arrive at Sophie's wedding in Greece to the surprise of her mother Donna, played by Georgia Kate Haege.

Williams fits as the sweet and persistent wide-eyed heroine Sophie. That character type can be tiring, but Donna's practicality gives the story balance.

Donna, looking to rekindle her spirit as "El Rock Chick Supremo," is a fiery mop of blonde curls. Haege radiates independence, so key to the character, and her jaded delivery of some of the musical’s more dramatic songs was startling.

Gabrielle Mirabella and Carly Sakolove are stellar as Donna's old best friends Tanya and Rosie, respectively. The leggy, confident Tanya and the hilarious Rosie steal the show.

Sakolove's rendition of “Take a Chance on Me,” while seducing Bill was charming and heartfelt. Mirabella shimmied with young studs to “Does Your Mother Know.” The boys need to remember their backpacks the next time she takes them to school.

Mirabella spoke to Folio Weekly by phone a week before the show, and her love of the character Tanya was clear.

“If I could have played another role, I guess I would have played Donna,” …   More

PLAYING AROUND

The blue men of Blue Man Group never talk, so of course, they must have handlers.

Before opening night Jan. 21, those handlers picked me randomly in the audience and sized me up. They were seeing whether I had what it took to become a human paintbrush.

As it turned out, one of those handlers doesn't like reporters. After she heard I was the Arts & Entertainment Editor at Folio Weekly, I was not surprisingly almost out. But the other guy (Aaron) liked either me or chaos — or both. Fortunately, I met their other criteria: skinny, geeky, lover of the arts, not claustrophobic and seriously in need of a haircut. So, I was the man for the job.

Then, that woman who really hates reporters swore me to secrecy on BMG’s methods at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater. Maybe, I was getting the theater version of good cop, bad cop.

Backstage, I saw things that I may never speak of again.

The audience saw the rest. Near the end of a wild performance featuring Twinkies, lots of paint, plumbing, lots of percussion and several stunts, a blue man ventured into the crowd and found me. I hugged him, thinking this was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. He didn’t hug me back.

On stage, they put me in a jumpsuit and a helmet, setting me up for the human paintbrush stunt they teased.

Throughout the Artist Series show — the first of eight shows through Jan. 26 — Blue Man Group amazed. They caught “paint balls” and candy in their mouths, taught “Rock Concert” movements to the crowd and created paintings and sculpture in ways most of us could never imagine.

They took shots at high-priced art and our cultural fascination with technology while fusing audience interaction, stunts and percussion in a show estimated at about 100 minutes (no intermission). Many of the stunts — including mine — were videotaped, so theatergoers in the balcony could see the action via the big screen.

Though BMG maintains a vow of silence, …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Manhood gets a bum rap, but it wasn’t always that way. In the day of cavemen, man hunted the plains; he did what he wished and ate meat from bone. It was a simple time.

Today, bookshelves and talk shows and magazine stands snub men as assholes. The problem is, no men deny it. But can man defend — maybe even justify — his instincts? Can he, as the fictional Lester Burnham so nobly did, reclaim his dick from the mason jar under the sink?

Spear in hand, comedian Cody Lyman sets out to answer this question in the Broadway original, “Defending the Caveman,” running Feb. 12-16 at the FSCJ South Campus’ Wilson Center.

Lyman stormed the stage for opening night Feb. 12, joined by the Venus of Willendorf, which he affectionately dubbed the “prehistoric Angelina Jolie,” and a stone carved sofa and television set. He soon scatters his cave floor with some very worn-looking tidy whites and a shower-towel, because it’s just more comfortable that way.

The show started a little slow, but Lyman soon picked up steam with his cave-dwelling antics and quips that hit home for many couples in the audience. He explained how men and women’s respective hunter-gatherer roles still show up in everything we do, from sex to communication to conflict resolution.

The audience was mostly older, but the relationship comedy seemed to hit home with the been-there-done-that crowd. Still, college students would still get a kick out of Lyman’s all-too-accurate portrayal of bachelorhood — a world he describes as a “dirty, dirty, place.”

A few simple lighting effects, along with Lyman’s delivery, were very effective in transporting the audience from one scene to the next. One minute, we were in “sacred circle of underwear” in Lyman’s living room. The next, we’re in an ominous red-lit cave. The next, on a lethargic fishing trip. Lyman could change the mood of the theater …   More

 
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