Do you have something to share? Submit your stuff
Viewing 61 - 70 of 169

ONE:

What better way to beat the summer heat than to stay in your garage and do nothing? And nothing beats some boss, primo Garage Rock to keep your body cool and your mind blank, as the Alien Abductors intended.

From 1983-1992, the "Back from the Grave" series unearthed and revived some of the greatest garage rock and protean punk tunes from the sixties.

This cut is featured on Vol. 5, which was released in 1985. In honor of this 30 year milestone, let us supplicate ourselves before some serious raunched out, dirty rock.

TWO:

Taken from Blue Öyster Cult's 1972 eponymously titled debut,  "She's as Beautiful as a Foot" is undoubtedly one of the weirdest and most tripped out songs ever released on a major label, especially during an era when quite a few bands were hanging out in their fringe jackets, reading Kahil Gibran's "The Prophet."

BOC are mainly known for their '70's FM radio hard rock hit, "Godzilla," but if you dig deeper into their earlier catalog, you will discover some lesser-known gems that are flat-out heady, brutal rock.

And we imagine that the Butthole Surfers were surely familiar with the sultry, psych-drenched flamenco-style weirdness of this tune.

THREE:

Make no mistake - Yoko was the coolest Beatle.

FOUR:

Brilliant, poetic, and smelly. Two out of three ain't bad.

FIVE:

A reminder that there's no justice in this world is the forever-overlooked career of Annette Peacock.

This cut, from her '72 album I'm the One, with it's killing groove, gurgling electronics, and Peacock's soulful delivery (filtered through even more electronics) is as radical today as it was 40+ years ago.

Dig in.

  More

It seems that Duval County Chief Judge Mark Mahon (DCCJMM to his fans) has rather narrow views of precisely when and where the Constitution applies. On July 1, DCCJMM handed down Administrative Order 2015-3, banning filming in certain areas of the courthouse and forbidding protests on courthouse grounds that “degrade or call into question the integrity of the court or any of its judges.” Nope, that’s not a joke. We checked.

Chief Judge Mahon’s administrative order created a free-speech-less bubble around the courthouse, the Office of the State Attorney, their parking garages, the lawn, the Courthouse sidewalks, heck, maybe even the skies above and the grounds below and everywhere else that freedom lives. Individuals who penetrated the free-speech-less bubble with their vile protests of the judiciary were subject to criminal contempt of court.

Well, why stop at restricting freedom of the press, freedom to peaceable assembly and freedom of speech? Here are some suggestions for DCCJMM for his future administrative orders.

1.     Free speech areas. Possible locations: The Jacksonville Landing (no one goes there, anyway), Cleveland Arms Apartments (they’re already protesting there, so it’s convenient), and I-95 during rush hour (we’re pretty sure there’s a precedent for this).

2.     Judicial chambers should be renamed ‘Star Chambers.’ You’re the star, baby. Let it shine.

3.     On the subject of names, DCCJMM doesn’t have that certain je ne sais quoi that denotes power and commands respect. So how about Supreme Transcendental Overlord ofLaws? or All Shall Serve the Honorable Overlord of Law and Ennui.

4.     In absentia criminal trials. The government spends buckets of dough shuttling inmates back …   More

ARTS

The temporal, fragile, and exacting nature of performance, but of dance specifically, extends to the viewer a kind of ascetic and athletic virtue that is removed from linear time. Or at least that is the feeling created by the recent performances of Rebecca Levy, Tiffany Fish, and Katie McCaughan's dance company, Jacksonville Dance Theatre.

Presented at the Munnerlyn Center for Worship and Fine Arts on the campus of the Episcopal School of Jacksonville on the evening of May 30, the company’s third annual concert was moving and varied. Transitioning between quiet and still works that carried an air of sanctity, to pieces like Thirst that thrummed with energy and vibrancy, the entire experience was one that reinforced the extraordinary nature of dance. It featured group works that sublimated the personal to an overarching form, and it also showed the power of one or two dancers works in unison and opposition.

Watching the duet, Finding an Opening was like bearing witness to private, sacred acts that somehow in their beauty affirm the very world itself. This work specifically, and The place of the end not imagined (which followed it), felt as if they occupy the spot in the world once held by sacred mysteries enacted with solemn ritual to ensure the continuity of the universe. As Opening began, a cloud hovered near the ceiling of the stage, and as it slowly dissipated, unwinding like a thread made of dandelion fuzz, two figures unfolded from the far (left) side of the stage. They moved through a series of motions that were at once playful and loaded, all of gravity and the essence of light. Watching it gave rise to the thought that if music is universal, and visual art and life intersect with life, then is dance not that sacred thing that can transmute into quiet or raucous spaces/stories and be made luminous flesh.

Levy, Fish, and McCaughan are all engaged in the Jacksonville dance community through teaching and choreographing, and this important …   More

Across the street from the Cleveland Arms apartment complex on Jacksonville’s Northside, at a corner shop called Li’l Albert Food Store, there was a protest event Monday evening in the wake of the police-involved shooting of Devanta Jones. Every prominent media outlet in Jacksonville was there – WJXT, First Coast News, Action News, and the Florida Times-Union. The protesters demanded answers – not just for the immediate incident (though that definitely was a primary motivator) but for larger, long-standing problems that have sabotaged the relationship between law enforcement and the community.

I spoke with Diallo Sekou of The Kemetic Empire, a black empowerment group that was central to bringing the protest together, who told me that incidents like the shooting of Devanta Jones were not “isolated” but “generational and systemic.”

Sekou and The Kemetic Empire have been at the forefront of the reactions to recent police-involved shootings, protesting events like those that occurred in Ferguson, Missouri, but its main goal is not headline-grabbing protest, but community empowerment, creating a sustainable community-based model that does not rely on government grants for the uplift of the people (in the manner of Malcolm X). That said, such community empowerment will not happen without serious reform in the way the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office does business and, to that end, Sekou and his organization have specific demands.

One such demand: a federal investigation of this incident at Cleveland Arms and of other police-involved shootings. The Kemetic Empire also wants a civilian police review board with subpoena power – currently, JSO lacks such a mechanism, and its investigations are internal – and body cameras for JSO members – a non-starter for both of the remaining Sheriff’s candidates, and an issue that Florida Governor Rick Scott is, on the state level, taking a wait-and-see …   More

THE FLOG

Heading into the mayoral election in May, the big hullabaloo currently shaking up Jacksonville’s political blogosphere is the recent TV attack ad by Republican Lenny Curry’s PAC peeps that aims to directly link the budget cuts and subsequent elimination of 147 police positions under incumbent Democrat Alvin Brown to an increase in the city’s crime rate, namely murder and rape. You’ve no doubt seen these omnipresent ads. They’re the ones that come on in between your Family Guy reruns, featuring spooky music and darkened imagery — basically likening 2015 J-ville to the alternate reality timeline in Back to the Future II wherein Marty McFly’s bully, Biff Tannen, is at the head of a morally corrupt, criminal-laden Hill Valley. The ad was blatant fear-mongering and, according to an investigation by First Coast News, riddled with factual inaccuracies and false interpretations (that’s media speak for “lies”). Murders and rapes did increase during Mayor Brown’s first term (though not at quite the astonishing rates indicated in the ad), but the overall crime rate went down. Mayor Brown did have something to do with the budget cuts (as did the cratering economy, but details), but he did not cut 147 officers; the final determination of the allocation of police force resources belonging to Dudley Do-Right (aka Sheriff John Rutherford), who also attributes the budget cuts to the rise in crime rates and is, conveniently, a supporter of Curry.

Of course, revealing the true figures and political motivations behind the manipulated statistics presented to us in the ad is all well and good but, from what I gather, every organization analyzing this ad seems to focus so much on the correlation that they are entirely ignoring the causation. Like conditions created by the hopelessness of unemployment and poverty. Like inadequately funded and staffed community youth outreach programs in high-risk neighborhoods. …   More

THE FLOG

Earlier today, and only 13 days after his deadline (he could be a Folio Weekly writer!), Dr. Dr. Herbert M. Barber Jr. — the Jacksonville Port Task Force consultant whose rather … shall we say … colorful views on poor people, environmentalists, integration and Barack Obama being a terrorist are contained in a 2012 book he wrote that nobody in the city bothered to Google before signing on the dotted line — finally turned the draft report that was due Feb. 13. (In keeping with his anachronistic sensibilities, it seems, he only filed a hard copy and not a digital one; the city has promised to email me a copy of the report as soon as it’s digitized, probably tomorrow see below.) 

The city responded with a very polite “thanks and by the way your services are no longer needed”: 

“In accordance with Section 8 of the Contract and Section 3.23 of RFP, the City has elected to terminate the Contract for convenience. Accordingly, this letter shall serve as the City’s written notice of termination to Xicon. The Contract shall be deemed terminated effective immediately upon receipt of this notice.” 

Don’t be worrying about Dr. Dr. Barber, you guys. Dude’s still gonna get paid. Per the notice: “The City is hereby relieved of all further obligations other than payment for the amount of services actually performed to the date of termination. … Please provide the City with an invoice within 30 days of this notice for services completely up to the date of this notice of termination. The City greatly appreciates your cooperation on this matter.” 

Because Dr. Dr. Barber’s work was mostly completely by the time the city found out about his book (from me, natch) — his final report was due March 2, and he was to present to the task force March 11 — he can (and probably will, since he only hates government money when less deserving people get it) …   More

THE FLOG

Last Friday, a federal court judge dismissed the complaint that Jeremy Banks, the St. Johns County Sheriffs deputy best known as the boyfriend of Michelle O’Connell — who may or may not have committed suicide back in September 2010 — filed last year against Florida Department of Law Enforcement Agent Rusty Rodgers, Folio Weekly has learned. That complaint alleged that Rodgers lied to and manipulated O’Connell’s family members into believing that Banks had killed her, and made false and derragotory statements about Sheriff David Shoar, including that he was helping cover up a homicide by one of his deputies. 

"Over a year ago,” Shoar said in a statement when the lawsuit was filed, “I personally made a complaint to FDLE regarding the egregious behavior of Rusty Rodgers and [fellow FDLE Agent] Dominic Pape during the investigation of the death of Michelle O'Connell. While Rodgers is currently the subject of an ongoing criminal investigation for 'official misconduct,' I am grateful the civil cases are moving forward to ultimately bring justice and closure to all involved."

On Feb. 13, U.S. District Judge Brian J. Davis dismissed Banks’ complaint without prejudice, which means Banks will have the opportunity to refile by March 5. In essence, Davis ruled in his seven-page order that Banks did not come close to establishing the probable cause the court needed to move the case forward. 

“The Court is mindful that proof is not required at this juncture of the case,” Davis wrote. “Nevertheless, Rule 8 requires a short plain statement sufficient to put Defendant on notice of facts or inferences from them which makes the absence of probable cause plausible. The allegations of Plaintiff’s Amended Complaint simply fail to accomplish that requirement.” 

We will update as we learn more. 

*This post and headline were updated to reflect the fact that the …   More

Having just returned from the first Ballots and Brews event held by the Young Voters Coalition, I have a few insights.

One of which is that, if you wanted to hear first-rate political gossip, you should have been there. It was a three hour game of inside baseball. Just keep your pen sheathed and your notepad in your back pocket.

Those who weren't there might wonder who was there. Those who were there know the answer.

Everyone.

If you were there around 6:00, you could have talked to Lenny Curry. Around 8:00, and you would have seen Alvin Brown, who worked the room like Bill Clinton himself (who apparently is going to be in town tomorrow for a big ticket fundraiser and a meeting with 250 "influencers", if the gossip tonight was on point). And staying the entire evening, Bill Bishop, who was in his element, talking to some of the most engaged voters in the entire city of Jacksonville.

If you wanted to talk to staff members, you would have seen them in force. From Curry campaign ops to key City Hall personnel, they were there -- and they were telling hilarious stories.

Sorry if you missed it. I can understand. You were busy. It was cold out. Riverside might have been far away.

But it was an epic party. 

Sheriff and Council candidates were there in abundance. Michelle Tappouni, Tommy Hazouri, Anna Brosche, Mincy Pollock, Tony Cummings, Jay Farhat, and a few more were working the crowd, pressing flesh and influencing voters.

Not just any voters either. But the ones who really give a damn. The most independent thinkers in the city were are Intuition Ale.

You weren't there? You missed Jesse Wilson and Wayne Wood. Kerry Speckman and Meredith O'Malley Johnson. And one of my favorite people in the city, James Richardson, who was dressed impeccably as always. 

You were drinking somewhere else? Hmm. Hard to beat Intuition Ale. I hope you liked your PBR.

If you needed proof that Jacksonville is really a small town, you would have …   More

THE FLOG

Editor’s note: David Carr was something of a hero of mine, dating back to the late ’90s when he was editor of the Washington City Paper, before he became nationally known as The New York Times’ media critic. Carr died last week. I never got to meet him, but Carr was a mentor and friend to my predecessor here at Folio Weekly, Anne Schindler, who worked with him at a now-defunct Minnesota alt-weekly called the Twin Cities Reader. She was kind enough to pen this wonderful remembrance of a legend in our field. — Jeffrey C. Billman

David Carr loved a good story, and it was part of his natural generosity that he left everyone he came into contact with at least one good story to remember him by.

In the 25 years I’ve known Carr, I’ve had the good fortune to cross paths with him in a slew of odd places, and whether getting lost on the streets of Tijuana, waging noodle wars in the lakes of the Adirondacks, or watching Sonic Youth aurally annihilate the 9:30 Club, each left an indelible memory.

Carr’s whole life was a caper, and he was ruthlessly candid about not wanting not to miss out. He had to taste everything on the menu, jump into every darkened swimming pool, and yes, “grind himself to the center of the universe” journalistically.

Carr gave me my first job in journalism, at the now-defunct alt-weekly the Twin Cities Reader. He was just shed of his crack addiction and cancer, and new to the job of editor. And he very nearly didn’t take me. After receiving the package of poorly written, sloppily edited college papers that served as my “writing sample,” he asked if I could at least type.

I could not. “It’s going to be difficult to explain to anyone in this newsroom why I would hire you,” he confided, “if you can’t even type.”

I spent that summer learning to type using a textbook, practicing on a series of postcards that I would send Carr as proof …   More

THE FLOG

A couple of weeks ago, the Jacksonville Port Task Force agreed to pay a Savannah-based consultant named Herbert M. Barber, the founder of Xicon Economics, $60,000 in money from the city’s Office of Economic Development to study the economic impact dredging will have. 

Perhaps you were wondering, who is this Barber fellow, whose LinkedIn page describes him as “Dr. Dr. Herbert M. Barber, Jr.”? (He has two PhDs, in engineering economics and industrial technology.) As it turns out, in addition to his economics business, he’s also an author. In 2012, he self-published a book called Fall of a Nation: A Biblical Perspective of a Modern Problem on a small Christian imprint. And according to Fall of a Nation, this nation of ours is going to hell in a handbasket. 

From an excerpt published on Amazon: 

America is quickly eroding as a nation. Our political, economic, and social structures have collapsed, and life as we know it is quickly disappearing. To correct our decline, Republicans argue that we need less government, and Democrats argue that we need more government. Both parties claim understanding, but apparently neither has wisdom. Unfortunately, we have failed to consult God in our attempt to recover.

God's word provides a clear illustration regarding where America is politically, economically, and socially in Genesis and Exodus. The demise of America parallels almost perfectly with the demise of the Israelites in Egypt. The similarities are eerily disturbing.

Big whoop, you say. The man has religious convictions. So does most everyone else. And so what if he thinks the country is on the wrong track? So do most Americans. Well, if that were all the deep thoughts Dr. Dr. Barber’s book contained, it would indeed not merit comment. 

But it’s not. If you read it — and I did, at least the first two-and-a-half chapters available on Google Books — Barber’s book …   More