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Flog Poll

Flog Poll (Escape From New York Edition)

 

The battle for New York is over, the frontrunners of both parties earning decisive victories in one of the most hyped primaries since that one that happened last week.

Feel The Bern Givin’ you the Feels?

To be fair, Sanders certainly outperformed expectations in his native state. Two weeks ago he trailed Clinton by double digits. Then he won Wyoming, got tickets to Hamilton and an invite to hang with The Pope (kind of). Momentum may be on his side.

Five Thirty Eight sees the race for the Democratic nomination tightening moving forward. While there are no numbers to back up the assertion that follows, Sanders seems to have benefited from a rather heavy-handed documentary (see:campaign ad) featuring the Vermont Senator walking the streets of his hometown, as actor/director/uber-Bernie Bro Mark Ruffalo tosses the candidate softballs and tries desperately to engage him in extensive periods of eye-contact, to no avail.

Enjoy the awkwardness below:

 

You Ain’t No Bern, You Bern

While Sanders had Ruffalo in his corner in New York, Hillary had the support of a half-dozen dorks at Columbia University. Also HRC got 6 in 10 Latino votes, 6 in 10 female votes, and two-thirds the minority votes in the NYC primary where 40% of registered voters are nonwhite.

Regardless, if your Facebook feed hasn’t yet made it clear, it ain’t cool to like Hillary. As I said weeks ago, Sanders is the perfect candidate for my generation: dug up like some old vinyl (a single like Lionel Ritchie’s “Hello” for example) by a demographic Hell-bent on coopting things from the past. “Authenticity,” the buzzword of the generation that gave rise to the hipster, is often used to describe Sanders’ appeal. Just replace reclaimed wood with Bernie’s speeches from the '80s and you have, in a nutshell, the soul of why he’s popular with the under-30 crowd in the first place.

So it’s not all that …   More

LET THERE BE LIT

On March 5, the 14th annual Douglas Anderson Writers’ Festival comes back home. After having outgrown the Douglas Anderson School of the Arts campus, where the festival began in the late 1990s, the last several festivals have been hosted at the University of North Florida, but with the $13 million expansion of Douglas Anderson’s campus, completed this year, the festival’s organizers decided it was high time to bring the festival home.

In the 20 years since its founding, the event has brought scores of the highest caliber writers to Jacksonville, including Billy Collins, Joyce Carol Oates, Margaret Atwood and Richard Ford.

This year’s headliner is Andre Dubus III, best known for his best-selling novel “House of Sand and Fog,” upon which the 2003 film featuring Jennifer Connelly and Ben Kingsley was based. Poets like Richard Blanco and William Trowbridge and fiction writers Tom Paine and Ron Carlson are offering Saturday workshops.

The 2016 festival, which features 17 writers, is the work of three D.A. creative writing teachers — Liz Flaisig, Tiffany Melanson, and Jennifer Bundy — and is funded largely by the school’s creative writing booster club.

Poet and creative writing teacher Melanson says that bringing the festival home allows the school to showcase its achievements to the community. In that way, it performs a role similar to D.A.’s Extravaganza, the annual showcase of music, writing, dance, cinematic arts, and visual arts that packs the house at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts each February.

Unlike Extravaganza, though, Melanson says the writers’ festival may have lost community understanding of its connection with the school when it was held at UNF.

Though the festival has featured some of the best-known American writers, it bills itself as “a student literary festival,” offering D.A. students a true immersion in literary arts.

Creative …   More

Folio Digital

YOUR MORRIS COMPASS

Morris Communications – owners of a diversified group of publications including daily newspapers The Augusta Chronicle, The St. Augustine Record, and The Florida Times-Union – is coming under fire for what a staffer at one of their dailies allegedly called a “xenophic editorial position” that “was mandated to run in Morris Communications newspapers across the chain.”

On his website, media critic Jim Romenesko posted an email allegedly provided by the staffer on Thursday, October 14. The email is credited to Robert Gilbert, vice president of audience at Morris Publishing Group/Morris Communications, to editors at all twelve MPG media outlets, and says the following (no emphasis added):

"Mr. Morris asks that each MPG newspaper run the attached editorial on American responsibility toward Mideast migrants/refugees. You should run it as your own editorial (not a column or op-ed), or produce your own editorial BUT MAINTAINING THE SAME POSITION. The editorial is for immediate release."

The Augusta Chronicle, ran an editorial on September 22, 2015 credited to the publication's editorial staff, which states the following:

"The Obama administration's plan to admit 85,000 refugees during the next year, and nearly 100,000 in 2017, is a self-destructive act born of dangerously deluded notions of compassion."

The editorial also notes that since the Syrian civil war broke out in 2011, the U.S. has given the country $4 billion in aid, the most of any nation, and goes on to warn that refugees may be terrorists.

Three days later, on September 25, The Florida Times-Union, published an editorial credited to its editorial staff, which states the following:

"The Obama administration needs to resist its well-meaning but misguided and potentially dangerous attempt to speed up admittance of Syrian refugees. There are too many possibilities that even a few of these …   More

FOLIO WEEKLY RETURNS TO ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH

Art Basel in Miami Beach attracts artists and art lovers from around the world and the entire city of Miami is transformed as multiple art fairs and festivals pop up from the beach to the Wynwood arts district and beyond.

Tachyons + (former Jacksonville noise collective members Logan Owlbeemoth and Omebi Velouria from Telepathik Friend) created trippy visuals using custom electronics and video effects during the Look Alive Festival at Churchill's Pub featuring Wolf Eyes and Silver Apples.

Zac Freeman had a piece displayed in the Context Art Miami show where Folio Weekly caught up with Overstreet Ducasse and Princess Simpson Rashid.

Ducasse’s brilliant artwork was featured in two shows just north of Wynwood (including the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center). Florida painter Kevin Grass displayed seven new photo realistic / surreal paintings at Spectrum Miami.   More

THE FLOG

BREAKING: JEREMY BANKS’ COMPLAINT AGAINST FDLE AGENT DISMISSED (FOR NOW)

Last Friday, a federal court judge dismissed the complaint that Jeremy Banks, the St. Johns County Sheriffs deputy best known as the boyfriend of Michelle O’Connell — who may or may not have committed suicide back in September 2010 — filed last year against Florida Department of Law Enforcement Agent Rusty Rodgers, Folio Weekly has learned. That complaint alleged that Rodgers lied to and manipulated O’Connell’s family members into believing that Banks had killed her, and made false and derragotory statements about Sheriff David Shoar, including that he was helping cover up a homicide by one of his deputies. 

"Over a year ago,” Shoar said in a statement when the lawsuit was filed, “I personally made a complaint to FDLE regarding the egregious behavior of Rusty Rodgers and [fellow FDLE Agent] Dominic Pape during the investigation of the death of Michelle O'Connell. While Rodgers is currently the subject of an ongoing criminal investigation for 'official misconduct,' I am grateful the civil cases are moving forward to ultimately bring justice and closure to all involved."

On Feb. 13, U.S. District Judge Brian J. Davis dismissed Banks’ complaint without prejudice, which means Banks will have the opportunity to refile by March 5. In essence, Davis ruled in his seven-page order that Banks did not come close to establishing the probable cause the court needed to move the case forward. 

“The Court is mindful that proof is not required at this juncture of the case,” Davis wrote. “Nevertheless, Rule 8 requires a short plain statement sufficient to put Defendant on notice of facts or inferences from them which makes the absence of probable cause plausible. The allegations of Plaintiff’s Amended Complaint simply fail to accomplish that requirement.” 

We will update as we learn more. 

*This post and headline were updated to reflect the fact that the …   More

FLOG

JaxPort Wants Deeper Harbor

JaxPort’s Board of Directors have voted unanimously to inform the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that it wants to dredge the harbor to no less than 47 feet deep to keep the port competitive.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had recommended Monday that the St. Johns River shipping channel be dredged from its current 40-foot depth to 45 feet deep. Port members, however, said recommended depth is not deep enough for the port to service larger cargo ships from Asia.

The JaxPort board members said they think the 47-feet depth is needed to keep Jacksonville competitive to other East Cost ports.

The federal government will pay 75 percent of the cost to dredge up to 45 feet. Anything deeper than that depth could be paid for with state, federal, local or private funds.

There were no cost figures discussed at Monday’s meeting. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will release the draft results of its harbor deepening study in May.

  More

FOLIO DIGITAL

The Power Meter

POWER DOWN: TIM TEBOW

Though he is widely considered to be the missing link in the Jacksonville Jaguars quest to gain relevance (win/loss record be damned), the former Northeast Florida prep star, Heisman trophy winner, and God’s chosen signal caller was unable to secure a supporting role in Chip Kelly’s Philadelphia Eagles offense, which was virtually invented for his brand of play.

NEXT: ONE CITY, ONE (LENNY CURRY APPOINTED) JACKSONVILLE >>>   More

THE FLOG

BETTER OFF WITHOUT US: THE CASE FOR DIVIDING FLORIDA

Grab your guns, crank up the truck and blast the Skynyrd, Duval, cause the South is gon’ rise again! Well, sort of … and, OK, this time, we’re technically going to be the North … oh, and it’s not a secession, really … and it’s not really our idea, but … but … Free Bird!

The real issue at hand is that a group of politicians in South Miami are essentially sick and tired of the northern part of Florida leaving them out to dry (or actually the opposite of that) when it comes to climate change issues in the southern part of the state. In response, they’ve proposed a bold but completely Florida-esque solution: Split the state in half and create their own state of “South Florida,” which would thus become the 51st state … if you count both Dakotas, but really, what’s the point of that? 

To answer your first question: no, this isn’t a story from The Onion. (This is, though.) This call for the legal separation of Florida into two separate states was actually cooked up — with delicious Cuban spices, I presume — by the mayor and city commission of South Miami. The threat of rising sea levels as a result of global warming, and the rest of the state’s blase attitude toward said crisis, was cited as the reason behind the proposal, which would slice Florida in half like a ripe grapefruit from approximately Orlando down.

Wait, Orlando? Oh no, you didn’t! You can take our beautiful Everglades National State Park away from us, but DO NOT FUCK with Mickey Mouse or our chintzy discount brand outlet stores!

From the Sun-Sentinel:

Orange County is particularly important because that's where the South Florida Water Management District begins, [Vice Mayor Walter] Harris said. It was even suggested that a Central Florida city could possibly be the state of South Florida's capitol.

Given the large number of Baptist churches here in North Florida, …   More

PLAYING AROUND

JOSH WALLER AND LINDSAY CURRY SHINE IN SUPERIOR 'CLYBOURNE PARK'

The nomadic 5 & Dime is pressing us out of our comfort zone again on a subject many Americans try to bury and ignore — race.

In April, Al Letson’s John Coffey Refuses to Save the World reminded us how popular stories skew our views with imaginary, magical Negroes. Now, director Rick De Spain and company unleash the Pulitzer and Tony award-winning Clybourne Park, which hits close to home on white privilege, institutional racism and the pursuit of the American Dream.

For artistry, ambition and strong acting as a group, The 5 & Dime scores again, with a creative team that must be applauded not only for their execution but also for their aspiration.

The romance of this troupe must be weighed against the hardships that come from acting without a home. All of Jacksonville’s makeshift stages come with their impediments.

In the John Coffey production at the Museum of Science & History, the short stage proved a hindrance, though the gamble to use the Planetarium’s wizardry was inspired.

At the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, space is less of a problem, but the gallery-turned-stage loses its charm in a matinee — as light peeks in from those celebrated gardens.

Supporting players Josh Waller, Lindsay Curry and Larry Knight hold our gaze with every second they’re on stage, helping Clybourne Park overcome the chaos inherent in its script.

Local favorite Josh Waller — sure to be in the running for Best Actor in Folio Weekly’s Best of Jax contest (end shameless plug) — plays the segregationist Karl, the entitled protector of the Clybourne property values. Somehow, he injects humor into this offensive, racist character.

Curry hits every note with spot-on comedic timing in both roles — as Karl’s deaf wife Betsy in Act I and as the apologetic “I once dated a black man” Lindsey in Act II. The expressive and charming Knight delivers his own humor …   More

ARTS

LUMINOUS-NESS AND CLOUD-NESS: MUSING ON THE JACKSONVILLE DANCE THEATRE

The temporal, fragile, and exacting nature of performance, but of dance specifically, extends to the viewer a kind of ascetic and athletic virtue that is removed from linear time. Or at least that is the feeling created by the recent performances of Rebecca Levy, Tiffany Fish, and Katie McCaughan's dance company, Jacksonville Dance Theatre.

Presented at the Munnerlyn Center for Worship and Fine Arts on the campus of the Episcopal School of Jacksonville on the evening of May 30, the company’s third annual concert was moving and varied. Transitioning between quiet and still works that carried an air of sanctity, to pieces like Thirst that thrummed with energy and vibrancy, the entire experience was one that reinforced the extraordinary nature of dance. It featured group works that sublimated the personal to an overarching form, and it also showed the power of one or two dancers works in unison and opposition.

Watching the duet, Finding an Opening was like bearing witness to private, sacred acts that somehow in their beauty affirm the very world itself. This work specifically, and The place of the end not imagined (which followed it), felt as if they occupy the spot in the world once held by sacred mysteries enacted with solemn ritual to ensure the continuity of the universe. As Opening began, a cloud hovered near the ceiling of the stage, and as it slowly dissipated, unwinding like a thread made of dandelion fuzz, two figures unfolded from the far (left) side of the stage. They moved through a series of motions that were at once playful and loaded, all of gravity and the essence of light. Watching it gave rise to the thought that if music is universal, and visual art and life intersect with life, then is dance not that sacred thing that can transmute into quiet or raucous spaces/stories and be made luminous flesh.

Levy, Fish, and McCaughan are all engaged in the Jacksonville dance community through teaching and choreographing, and this important …   More