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Jaguars Unveil New Logos

Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan unveiled new logos and a rebranding effort tailored to reflect three distinct and powerful attributes that will describe the team on and off the field _ “proud, bold and committed.”

“To be a success in business or life, you have to stand for something and hold yourself accountable to the principles you believe in,” Khan said.

“From this day, the Jacksonville Jaguars will live a brand mission of being proud, bold and committed in everything we do. Our new logo and campaign theme are the first initiatives of what will be many examples of bringing this philosophy to life,” Khan said in a news release.

The new identity keeps the Jaguars' traditional colors of black, teal and goal while offering a fiercer looking and truer depiction of a Jaguar.

The Jaguars will introduce a shield featuring a bold graphic treatment of the nickname “Jags.”

The new logos will be rolled out throughout the 2013 season as part of the team’s “Stand United” theme.

“Stand United is about the community and theme coming together and a way of life that anyone who loves the Jaguars and Jacksonville can personally understand and appreciate,” Khan said.



Folio Weekly Editor Moves to MOCA

Folio Weekly Editor Denise M. Reagan is going Downtown.

After 18 months of advocating for Downtown Jacksonville and the arts through her columns, Reagan has taken a job as communications manager at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville.

Reagan joined Folio Weekly in July 2012. She focused on increasing the publication’s credibility through tight editing, story choice and distinguishing between news and opinion. She launched the popular Specktator blog by Kerry Speckman (winner of Best of Jax Best Blog), the Bite-sized column by Caron Streibich and the controversial but entertaining Crime City column by Wes Denham.

She helped design and launch a completely revamped in January 2013, increasing the publication’s reach and readership. The new site includes all of the content from weekly printed issues plus stories, blogs, photo galleries and videos available only online.

Reagan gained a following for her weekly Editor’s Notes, covering timely community issues, politics and the arts; she won an award from the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies for column writing during her first year.

Her use of social media greatly increased Folio Weekly’s Facebook fans and Twitter followers, engaging them in conversations that often ended up in the printed issues.

Her last day at Folio Weekly is Dec. 6. Her first day at MOCA is Dec. 9. Her last Editor’s Note will appear Dec. 11.    More

Klan Attempts to Prove it Still Exists

In an apparent effort to prove that the Ku Klux Klan is still capable of spreading hate somewhere other than the internet, a couple of ignorant Southside boys in a pickup truck papered Riverside with racist fliers yesterday morning. This was the latest local effort to recruit perpetual-adolescent bigots with low IQs and big dreams of reliving the pre-Civil War "glory days" when their ancestors were poor yeoman farmers one drought from starvation.

Similar messages were distributed in various neighborhoods around Jacksonville last March and November. In November, News4Jax reported meeting with a man identifying himself as Grand Dragon Ken with the KKK; in a conversation in his (probably) dumpy Southside, Jacksonville home, Ken (who declined to give his last name or confirm whether Barbie was the mastermind of his Grand Plan) ranted nonsensically about various complex policy issues he clearly didn't understand and said the fliers were the beginning of a major statewide recruitment effort.

Whites in Riverside were miffed. One wondered aloud if the alleged Klansmen knew that only liberals live in Riverside. Reminded that Donald Trump's local HQ is in the neighborhood, she shrugged, "Well, I guess there's one place they could recruit members."

“I didn’t even realize the Klan still existed,” said hipster “Bob” between sips of Aardwolf Belgian Pale Ale at a Five Points bar. “And now that I do, I’m kind of embarrassed for them. I mean, get a clue. Overt racism is so 20th century. Now it’s all about systemic racism.”

At Folio Weekly Magazine’s suggestion, Bob, who gave a fake name in case his girlfriend finds out he was at the bar when he was supposed to be volunteering at a homeless shelter, dialed the central North Carolina phone number listed on the flier. While listening to the outgoing voice message, he had what can only be described as an “attack of the …   More



UPDATE: As a result of this story, the schoolteacher referenced in this story has been dismissed from the jury.

Richard David Smith III is a name familiar to Folio Weekly readers, who saw his byline on almost a weekly basis a few years back. Last week, he came very close to serving on the latest Trial of the Century of the Week — the Michael Dunn retrial that tops our local news every evening. But it didn’t quite happen.

Smith spent three days at the courthouse for jury screening, a process he describes as “very long” and filled with “odd questions” from “too many lawyers trying to be comedians,” making “a lot of jokes about budget cuts.”

Some of those japes came from Angela Corey, who seems intent on improving her public image with this case. Folks on hand were treated to cornball quips like “I might break into song,” a joke she made while being told to hold the mic by the judge.

Many of the questions, Smith says, had to do with “race and gun ownership” — a trend reflected in the composition of the jury, many of whom have guns. It seemed to him — and to me — that the sweet spot in jury selection, those agreeable to prosecution and defense, led to a preponderance of gun owners with children. Given the fact that 10 of the 12 jurors are white, clearly there were factors other than race that came into play.

“I think the defense wanted white males, particularly gun owners,” he says. “I couldn’t quite figure out what the prosecution was looking for other than minorities and/or people with children.”

During the jury selection process, Smith asked for and received a private sidebar. When he divulged that he had written for Folio Weekly in the past, he says, “Angela Corey expressed great sensitivity to things that had been written about her there.” [Editor’s note: Ha.]

“She said, ‘you know …   More

Giant Stumps for CLINTON


In the mid-afternoon lull on Sept. 29, as people lounged and chatted between classes on the sun-washed green at the University of North Florida, a tight knot of students, faculty, spectators and media waited anxiously for a hero to arrive.

A ripple of anticipation passed through the crowd the moment he stepped into view 100 yards away, casually ambling towards them with perfect ease, smiling all the way.

A seven foot tall hulk of a man, former NBA center Jason Collins is not merely physical large, he is a huge symbol of bravery and hope for millions. In 2014, Collins became the first openly gay person to play in the NBA. 

He is a living, breathing hero for LGBT rights and equality.

“My life is exponentially better since coming out,” Collins told the rapt crowd, many of whom are LGBT like him. Collins’ story of fighting his truth, trying to fit in, to be the straight man he thought he was supposed to be before coming out to himself and his family at 33, the world shortly thereafter, resonated. In so many ways, his story is their story.

And for many, so is his political message: Collins has been on a whirlwind tour of Florida urging people to register to vote and campaigning for Hillary Clinton. He’s of the mind that a vote for Clinton is a vote for equality, a vote for acceptance, a vote for the future of a country that is already great – but could easily turn back the clock of inclusion on November 8.

After he spoke to the crowd, Folio Weekly Magazine had the honor of sitting down with the champion.

Collins explained that he isn’t merely stumping for Clinton the politician, he’s putting himself out there for Hillary the person. A classmate of Chelsea Clinton’s at Stanford University, Collins has known the Clintons for almost 20 years. Bill and Hillary came to his graduation party; his sister-in-law was a bridesmaid in Chelsea Clinton’s wedding and she in …   More


One Spark Needs 800 Volunteers

One Spark needs help — and lots of it. About 800 volunteers are needed to support on-the-ground operations during the April 17-21 event, which is billed as the world’s first crowd-funded festival.

“We are looking for volunteers with a shared passion for Jacksonville, especially downtown, and the desire to make One Spark a great experience for attendees,” said One Spark Volunteer Services Manager Meredith O’Malley Johnson.

A volunteer open house is scheduled 5:30-7:30 p.m. Feb. 28 at the Main Library, 303 Laura Street in downtown Jacksonville. One Spark team members will pass out volunteer information and answer questions.

Volunteers must be at least 18 years old and take a one-hour training session before the festival. Volunteers must agree to work at least one four-hour shift during the festival week. Visit for more information.




St. Augustine has just wrapped up six days of cheers and jeers in recognition of its 450th year arguing with the Isle of Eight Flags (that’s Fernandina Beach, boys and girls) over who called dibs first. For the record, European honkies settled the Isle in 1562, so we’re going with our northerly neighbors on this one. (453 > 450).

Unhappily, St. Aug’s 450th did not lack drama. Apparently Native Americans have not gotten over the teensy matters of genocide, enslavement and betrayal by Pedro Menéndez de Avilés and his merry band of Spanish settlers and African slaves (“Resist 450,” Folio Weekly, Sept. 2).

But we’re not going to let that stop us from having a good time, are we, boys and girls? Hellz no. This situation calls for the Spin Dr.! (Not to be confused with Spin Doctors, a flash-in-the-pan early ’90s band who today wishes they could get a gig playing “Little Miss Can’t be Wrong” on the second and fourth Wednesdays at Joe’s Crab Shack.)

Spin Dr. is a dark magic magi who performs such public relations miracles as divorcing Jared from Subway from our mental impression of the foot-long spicy Italian; who convinced the nation that President Jimmy Carter was a cotton-headed fool for advocating energy efficiency (Get well, Mr. Carter! We know you’re no fool); who named the Civil War, then renamed it the War of Northern Aggression after South Carolina hired her.

To round out your understanding of Spin Dr.’s capabilities, here’s a rundown of projects she’s working on:

1. The Trail of Tears

Sounds so dark and depressing. Refer to it instead as “first and largest group to attempt ambitious walk across country.”

a. ??Possible product placement opportunity?? Reach out to fashion houses and shoemakers ASAP

2. Japanese Internment

At first blush, innocuous — who doesn’t like interns, am I right? *high five* …   More


TEDxJacksonville Wants You


Most people have at least heard of and may have listened to the informative, engaging TED Talks. A 1984 conference that began in California really took off six years later and has been held annually ever since. The talks have become more and more popular after being broadcasted online for free. TED Talks are held to a max of 18 minutes, giving viewers a fun, fast way to learn while also being thought-provoking and inspiring. 

TED stands for "Technology, Entertainment, and Design" but has widened that scope since 1984 by exploring, connecting, and educating on any "idea worth spreading," which is the TED slogan.  

Last October, Jacksonville hosted its first TEDx (the "x" indicating an "independently organized event),“Collective Genius.” TEDxRiverside/Avondale hosted nine speakers, four recorded TED talks and four entertainment performances. Jeff Spear, TEDxJacksonville media liaison and partnership relations director, said “the event was very successful and completely sold out.”

On Oct. 26, TEDxJacksonville's evolved and expanded event theme will be "Connecting Currents." The theme refers not only to the St. Johns River, the location of the event, but also the connections between Jacksonville's history, culture and people.  

The organizers are accepting applications from those who would like to speak or perform. Spear said speakers must have great ideas that are worth sharing but must also be able "to make the presentation of their lives." As anyone who has watched TED Talks knows, the "E" for entertainment is always emphasized. Those who want to speak or perform (as well as those who want to suggest speakers andperformers) are encouraged to apply early, although the official deadline is June 30.

TED Talks require not only engaging performers and speakers but also a responsive audience. Those, who wish to attend this year’s event must complete an application, …   More


UNF Spinnaker Ponders Change to Magazine

The University of North Florida’s student newspaper, the Spinnaker, is considering a move from a weekly tabloid to a glossy magazine published monthly.

Spinnaker Editor in Chief Jacob Harn said May 15 that student leaders have had internal discussions with Media Adviser John Timpe and university administrators, and the business office is evaluating how the move would affect revenue.

The Spinnaker also wants to hear from students, faculty, staff and alumni through a survey made available this week. The early response in discussions has been positive, Harn said.

“We’re keeping our eyes open in a digital age and focusing on the website for daily coverage,” Harn said of the plans.

The tentative plan for publishing a magazine would call for 10 monthly issues — including two double issues — beginning in Fall 2013.

“People can expect more investigative news pieces and longer and more in-depth feature pieces,” if the student publication makes the change, Harn said.

The Spinnaker plans to print three more issues in its current tabloid format — once each in June, July and August.

Timpe said the students’ enthusiasm has been a driving force in giving them a chance to make the change for the fall semester.

“It’s enthused not only the print staff, but also the TV, radio and digital staff here. There have been a lot of lively discussions,” Timpe said.

Timpe sees an opportunity for students to experiment where other traditional media might not have the initiative.

“Media operations of all sizes are still trying to figure out the future and to some degree the present,” he said. “That’s one of the benefits of working with a college media outlet. They’re full of students ready to try something new.”

The Spinnaker currently publishes a weekly run of 4,000 issues. Timpe said the monthly run would likely be 10,000 to 12,000 issues, …   More


George Zimmerman -- Dadaist Genius

I don't know art, but I know what I like. And I think I like George Zimmerman's latest painting.

It is absolutely brilliant, on an artistic level. The yellow ink on a red backdrop -- evocative of the Chinese flag in its bold use of what in America are condiment colors. The primitivist rendering of the subject, the eyes frozen without soul, the Katherine Harris bangs,the gaudy necklace like a Kool Moe Dee gold chain; this painting lays it all bare like a chicken plucked and slaughtered. 


Forget who painted it. If it were Basquiat, you'd feel differently. The style, reminiscent of the brilliant painter and iconoclast, Lee Harvey. Bold strokes used in bold ways to make bold statements.


And the quote up top? Perfectly understated. Sort of, well, at odds with the Zimmerman public persona -- a Travis Bickel figure who fights with trolls on Twitter and creates bizarre publicity stunts and claims that Sean Hannity is the last honest man in national journalism.

He plays a buffoon on TV. But what if he is working us all?

Angela Corey is not a popular politician, though she is effective. She plays hardball, and she doesn't lose. Which is part of the reason she alone among local political figures would merit being the subject of a painting at all, never mind one of this quality and thematic resonance.

I have, of course, some unsourced theories on Zimmerman's paintings. One of them being that there might be no better way for him to launder money than by creating a dummy market for some awful paintings -- like that first one he did, allegedly plagiarized, that still netted $100k.

Brilliant! Never occurred to Aileen Wuornos, Casey Anthony, or Ted Bundy to bring it like that. George Zimmerman's first painting: a dummy shell, intended to establish a market price for anything with his imprimatur. A price for the celebrity that comes with shooting a teenage boy in cold blood because he was getting pummelled by that boy, whom he stalked in …   More