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THE FLOG

Daily's Place: Ready to ROCK and Roll?

Today, there were two press conferences about the opening of Daily's Place, the new venue, this weekend. The first, hosted inside City Hall at 1:30 p.m., included remarks from Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry, the city's Sports & Entertainment Officer Dave Herrell and Chad Johnson, Senior Vice President of Bold Events, the Jaguars' newest venture.

The mayor began the meeting talking about the upcoming weekend festivities. After drawing a chuckle saying that while he would attend some events, you wouldn't see him dancing, Curry said, "Daily's Place is adding another family weekend of fun and art."

The new amphitheater constructed at the south end of EverBank Field is set to have its first concert on Saturday, May 27. Daily's Place has a lot in store for 2017, including 42 concerts currently scheduled. However, there have been some questions about whether the venue will be finished in time. From outside the construction fencing this afternoon, seating appeared mostly complete; however, the stage remained unfinished.

Even though Jaguars insiders say that the construction crew is essentially working around the clock, with Saturday right around the corner, some are skeptical. Staff and local officials have no doubt it will be ready in time, however. Johnson said, "Daily's will open this Saturday. We have a great crew working the next three days to put this together. It will make Jacksonville proud with the facilities we can provide."

The 2:30 p.m. press conference, in the lavish US Upper Assure Club West of EverBank Field, included remarks from the CEO of Bold Events, Mark Lamping. The meeting consisted of a run-through on how the venue will operate, its amenities and features and some information on how ready the amphitheater is for Saturday.

Asked whether the venue is safe to hold a concert and if all permits had been obtained, Lamping said, "This is very typical in a project this large. All building systems have been signed off." He followed up, …   More

the flog

“We Are Climbing Jacob’s Ladder” and it is a Protest SONG

 

Carrie Mae Weems speaks in a voice pitched low, as if she is sharing the secrets of a lifetime. It's a warm voice, a voice that speaks poetically of travels, adventure, novels and the works of other artists, always with a smile hovering just at the edge.

Weems is one of the most important living artists today. The recipient of the MacArthur "Genius" Grant, the Prix de Roma, and the W.E.B. Du Bois Medal from Harvard University among many others, she's been extensively profiled by publications of note and record, including PBS's "Art21." She is also the first African-American woman to have a retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum. Weems has a BFA from the California Institute of the Arts, Valencia; an MFA from the University of California, San Diego; and she studied folklore in the graduate program in Folklore at the University of California, Berkeley. Currently, works from her mid-'90s suite, Sea Islands Series, 1991-1992, are on view at the Jepson Center for the Arts in Savannah. The series is the result of the artist's fascination with the Gullah Geechee peoples of the coastal islands of the Southeastern United States.

Folio Weekly hustled up to Georgia's First City to attend the lecture that accompanied the exhibition's opening night.

In her discussion, Weems described the catalyst of the works: her disbelief when her father would tell her stories of this group of black people who lived on islands off America's Southeast Coast. A people who had their own language, own way of doing things and their own belief systems. She said that when she was a young woman, she went there and discovered he had spoken the truth.

She then spent about three years traveling back and forth between California and Savannah, developing this body of work. Steeped in photography wed to text and clay, the pieces seem to exist in a realm of storytelling between objective truths and dream truths. Doubling-down on this feeling are three recordings …   More

THE FLOG

Cheering for the Community

“At the heart of everything we do is that pride. The pride for the Jaguars and the pride for Jacksonville,” said John Caputo, president of the Bold City Brigade.

More than 100 supporters showed up to attend the Bold City Brigade’s community event to benefit The Boselli Foundation June 1 at Intuition Ale Works. The Bold City Brigade, a local nonprofit dedicated to building the Jacksonville Jaguars fan base, hosted the event to donate money to The Boselli Foundation, founded by former Jacksonville Jaguar Tony Boselli.

Caputo, along with a small group of people, started the Bold City Brigade to promote excitement for the Jacksonville Jaguars and support the community of Jacksonville.

“First and foremost we wanted to do a charity event, period. It was really important for us when we started the group. We always wanted to have a charitable arm of the organization, and with that we chose an organization that was locally rooted and that people knew about,” Caputo said.

The Boselli Foundation is a faith-based nonprofit organization that provides disadvantaged youth with after school learning programs through Angi and Tony Boselli's Youth Life Learning Centers. Established in 2007, The Boselli Foundation now has two youth centers set up in the Northside of Jacksonville.

With this community event, the Bold City Brigade estimates about $7,000 to be donated to The Boselli Foundation.   More

THE FLOG

Bill Cosby’s Call to Action

Billy Cosby, one of America's favorite father-figures, embodied the theme of Jacksonville's two-day education summit, "Increasing Parental Involvement."

The 75-year-old comedian and education activist spoke to a full house at The Florida Theatre Feb. 28 on behalf of Mayor Alvin Brown. Action News co-anchor Mark Spain hosted the event, which began with a drum line competition between four Duval County Public Schools — an idea from Cosby.

“Nothing bothers me more than hearing, ‘We don't have good schools in Jacksonville,’” Spain said before introducing Cosby.

Sporting sweatpants and a "Learn 2 Earn" T-shirt, Cosby began his lecture by teasing the mayor and poking fun at the Jacksonville Jaguars' past season, comparing them both to well-known cities that are "on the Weather Channel."

“Now they know your pro football team,” Cosby said. “Other cities love your pro football team.”

Then Cosby took the audience back to his childhood with stories of growing up poor and the old-fashioned days of parenting, when some parents took a more physical approach. The golden three-word rule he used to survive childhood? “Don't talk back.”

“In the South you don’t get beatings, you get whoopings,” Cosby joked.

Cosby said he strongly believes improving the quality of the nation’s education begins with parents. He ended with one last call-to-action to the people to fix Jacksonville’s education system.

“Nobody is coming,” Cosby said. “Only you.”   More

EAR WORM

ONE:

What better way to beat the summer heat than to stay in your garage and do nothing? And nothing beats some boss, primo Garage Rock to keep your body cool and your mind blank, as the Alien Abductors intended.

From 1983-1992, the "Back from the Grave" series unearthed and revived some of the greatest garage rock and protean punk tunes from the sixties.

This cut is featured on Vol. 5, which was released in 1985. In honor of this 30 year milestone, let us supplicate ourselves before some serious raunched out, dirty rock.

TWO:

Taken from Blue Öyster Cult's 1972 eponymously titled debut,  "She's as Beautiful as a Foot" is undoubtedly one of the weirdest and most tripped out songs ever released on a major label, especially during an era when quite a few bands were hanging out in their fringe jackets, reading Kahil Gibran's "The Prophet."

BOC are mainly known for their '70's FM radio hard rock hit, "Godzilla," but if you dig deeper into their earlier catalog, you will discover some lesser-known gems that are flat-out heady, brutal rock.

And we imagine that the Butthole Surfers were surely familiar with the sultry, psych-drenched flamenco-style weirdness of this tune.

THREE:

Make no mistake - Yoko was the coolest Beatle.

FOUR:

Brilliant, poetic, and smelly. Two out of three ain't bad.

FIVE:

A reminder that there's no justice in this world is the forever-overlooked career of Annette Peacock.

This cut, from her '72 album I'm the One, with it's killing groove, gurgling electronics, and Peacock's soulful delivery (filtered through even more electronics) is as radical today as it was 40+ years ago.

Dig in.

  More

GET ON BOARD JACKSONVILLE'S NEWEST NIGHT TROLLEY

After an initial test run, the Riverside Avondale Night Trolley launched earlier this year to great success, shuttling Riverside riders Friday and Saturday nights during the first weekend of every month. Now organizers want to bring the same service Downtown. This weekend, a fleet of buses will roll out to various Downtown hot spots, including The Elbow district of nightclubs, bars and restaurants, and connect to the Riverside Avondale Night Trolley in 5 Points. If enough of us ride, maybe JTA will think about making it permanent.   More

Playwright JENNIFER CHASE helps us Celebrate the Amazing Human Spirit

 

Talking to Jennifer Chase is like trying to pin the wind. The writer, playwright, singer and teacher seems always to be in motion, moving through time and space in multiple dimensions—like something Dali might paint. Maybe it is because with her long blond dreadlocks, cat-eye glasses and sweeping multi-layer printed panel dresses she seems to expand and contract, reacting to ideas and situations with action, music and wit.

 

Chase’s newest project, Renunciant, has been over a decade in the making. A solo show that showcases Chase’s range of storytelling abilities, the piece encapsulates some of the personal stories of survival that her English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) students, refugees would tell her.

 

“One assumes that these people had just left, say, south Sudan, but in the case of one student, he had been out of his country [and trying to get to America] for ten years,” said Chase. “He had to cross the desert, get to Lybia, then on to Tunisia and Germany before he was able to make it here legally.”

 

In 2003 when Chase began teaching, she said that her main goal was to create a safe place for her students. “How well will they learn English if they don’t trust the people they are studying with,” she asked rhetorically.

 

She also said that the trust-building she aimed for in the classroom helped many of her students deal with the loneliness that comes with living in a place where you know no one and life is hard, “…and they don’t feel like they are justified, like they have the right to complain,” she said of people who still have ties to a homeland, but because they “made it out” they feel as if grousing about their situation—even if they work long hours and take multiple busses to get through their days—feels like it devalues the sacrifices family and friends made to help them get …   More

Harvard Study Slams Duval for Overusing Death Penalty

Researchers at Harvard Law School's Fair Punishment Project have identified Duval County, Florida as part of the tiny minority of counties in the nation - one half of one percent - that have handed down five or more death penalty sentences between 2010 and 2015.  The report is titled “Too Broken to Fix: Part 1; An In-depth Look at America’s Outlier Penalty Counties."

 

 

“Between 2010-2015, in Duval there were 15 defendants sentenced to death,” Fair Punishment Project spokeswoman Stefanie Faucher wrote in a statement to Folio Weekly Magazine. She explains that in 2015, one individual was resentenced to death following an appeal, bringing the total to 16. Duval is responsible for roughly one-fourth of all Florida death-penalty sentences during this time period, despite comprising only 5 percent of the state’s population. And it’s not because we have the worst of the worst in terms of murderers, the study maintains.

 

 

The report released Tuesday examines eight of the 16 counties and the factors that make them different from the rest of the nation, which has largely abandoned the death penalty.

The FPP found three commonalities amongst the 16 “outlier” counties that outstrip the rest of the nation in death penalty sentencing.

“In the small number of counties where the death penalty still exists, we found of evidence of egregiously bad defense lawyering, rampant prosecutorial misconduct and overzealousness, and a pattern of racial bias that undermines the fairness of the death penalty,” noted Rob Smith, one of the report’s researchers. 

 

Racial bias 

For example, during the five-year period studied (2010-'15), in Duval, 87 percent of defendants sentenced to death were black, a number that is hugely disproportionate to African-American residency in Jacksonville. (Merely 30.1 percent of Duval County residents are …   More

THE FLOG

St. Augustine Company Makes Musicians Social

St. Augustine-based social media agency Make Me Social recently added some fins to its clientele.

The 12-employee operation, founded in 2009 by Chief Strategic Officer Josh Jordan, now represents artists with Jimmy Buffett’s record label, Mailboat Records, including reggae artist Mishka and Hawaiian ukulele musician Jake Shimabukuro.

The company uses data analytics software to figure out how and when to best target social media audiences for optimal interaction.

“We were able to help get Mishka to number one on iTunes for reggae charts, figure out how to get audiences engaged and excited about the album, then do branding on social media channels,” Jordan said.

And they’re utilizing a lot of social media channels. Jordan, 37, said the company uses Facebook, Twitter, Blogger, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, YouTube, Vimeo, Reddit and more to promote its clients, which also include media giant Hearst Publishing and financial services firm Morgan Stanley.

“Everybody’s sitting … with a vending machine in their hands. They’ve got these cell phones, they’re tweeting, they’re Facebooking, they’re taking pictures, they’re recording video – and it’s a huge opportunity for brands to engage,” said Jordan.

Make Me Social has satellite offices in Baltimore, Los Angeles and New York, and Jordan said he hopes the company will continue to bridge the gap between offline and online engagement for a range of clients.   More

GOING FOR 'BROKE'

Julian Robertson was running late to his audition, his feet frozen and

his pants snow-wet. Little could he have imagined how that winter day in Manhattan would shape his summer here in Jacksonville.  But then, he had no idea that The Juilliard School, the nation’s premiere performing arts school, would accept him into their acting program.

The 18-year-old Douglas Anderson School of the Arts graduate has found a way to parlay his hometown life into a summer play, aptly entitled “Broke,” as a fundraiser for his first year’s educational expenses at his dream school. Robertson will be one of only 18 acting students in the world admitted to Juilliard’s acting department this fall.

The young actor and playwright pulled a few of his friends from Douglas Anderson to direct and act in his original play. The cast has been rehearsing daily for weeks. “Broke” will premiere at The Performer’s Academy on Beach Blvd. on Friday, August 5.

Sitting across the kitchen table from Robertson, discussing his young characters and their pronounced moral conflicts, it’s easy to forget he’s only eighteen.

He explains that the play centers on a handful of young friends who grew up together in a hardscrabble neighborhood modeled on Robertson’s own North Jacksonville community.

“All of the characters are in survival mode,” Robertson says. “Markis has dug a hole for himself too big to get out of. He’s lost touch with who he is. He has a massive debt, and the clock is ticking.”

Robertson says that after “bouncing around in his head” for months, the story poured out of him “all at once,” when he returned from the Rutgers Summer Acting Conservatory in 2015.

“I sat down at the computer and I tried to write what they were saying,” he says of the play’s characters. “I was trying to catch it all.”

The characters are …   More