PLAYING AROUND

'Antiques Roadshow' Rolls into Jacksonville

Norman Studios will have a spot asking for copies of Richard Norman's silent films

Noel Barrett (right) talks to the owner about his Lionel train at the Chattanooga Antiques Roadshow, which will air July 15.
Jeff Dunn/WGBH
Allan Katz (left) appraises an 1880s Crazy Quilt at the Antiques Roadshow in Seattle aired on May 27.
Jeff Dunn/WGBH
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8 a.m.-5 p.m. June 8

Prime F. Osborn III Convention Center, 1000 Water Street

Tickets: Free

Antiques Roadshow website

"Antiques Roadshow" has been on PBS since the late 1990s. It is a show that travels across the country throughout the summer, featuring the antiques of those attending and appraising those items.

This will be show's first trip to Jacksonville, but "Antiques Roadshow" has been to Florida five times previously. Executive Producer Marsha Bemko said they wanted to go to a city they had never been to before, and there are not many places they can go to for the first time anymore.

More than 15,000 people registered to attend the show, but ony 3,000 were randomly selected and given a pair of tickets. If you applied for a ticket online by the deadline, April 8, you can use Ticket Checker to check your ticket status.  

The event begins at 8 a.m., and ticket holders will be admited according to the time on their tickets. The last entrance time is 5 p.m., but the event will not end until all items have been appraised.

Each attendee can bring two items and must bring at least one. There are 20 categories in which the attendees' items will be placed and then matched with an appreaiser. The appraisals can be suspenseful and surprising, as usually items are worth either more or less than they were originally thought to be. 

"We know there will be treasures there, and we want to go find them. And we know that more than 15,000 people want to show us their treasures," Bemko said.

Three episodes will be created from the Jackonville visit, plus a "Junk in the Trunk" episode, which will be aired in the spring TV season starting in January. Bemko suggested subscribing to their newsletter for updates on when episodes will appear.

The show will also record a five-minute segment at Norman Sudios on June 7 called "Roadshow's Most Wanted." In the 1920s, Richard Norman, the founder of the studios, made a number of silent adventure films that broke the racial barrier in the film industry by including African-American actors in positive, non-stereotypical roles. The studio is asking people for copies of any of Richard Norman's films, especially "The Wrecker."  

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