BITE-SIZED

A LITTLE BIT OF THIS, A LITTLE BIT OF THAT

The Dim Sum Room touts an abundance of flavorful Cantonese small plates

Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
Caron Streibich
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Inside Watami Buffet & Lounge

9041 Southside Blvd., Southside, thedimsumroom.com

• V Pizza is slated to open in late May at 1406 Hendricks Ave. in San Marco.

• Terra Restaurant at 4260 Herschel St. in Avondale has closed. The spot is the new home of J. William Culinary, touted as

“gourmet fitness meals for active people.”

I’m about to let you in on some secrets. One: Until last week, I’d never experienced dim sum. (I know, right?) Two: Inside a restaurant, inside a strip mall, lies a special room that serves up Cantonese-style small plates — dim sum — that will rock your world.

Since dim sum isn’t readily available across the area, it was exciting to order a range of dishes and embark on an exploration of these new-to-me items. Dim sum is essentially Chinese tapas, served on individual small plates or in a small steamer basket. You won’t find most of these versions on a standard Chinese menu.

We started with the chicken feet ($3.75), shark’s fin dumplings ($4.25), scallop dumpling ($4.25), fried shrimp balls ($4.25), shumai ($3.75), fried taro dumpling ($3.75), steamed taro bun ($3.75) and crispy pork belly ($9.95).

So, the chicken feet? Not for the faint of heart, or me — lots of small bones, odd texture (think of the fat that surrounds your rib-eye) and generally weird because they arrive looking like little feet that are waving (or high-fiving?) at you. Since they’re mostly skin, I found them to have an extremely gelatinous mouthfeel. My tablemates loved them, so maybe it’s just not my thing.

The piping-hot oversized shrimp balls had a super-crisp, crunchy exterior akin to fried noodles, which gave way to a chewy, shrimpy interior. Along with the shark’s fin dumplings, fried taro dumplings, steamed taro buns and crispy pork, I’d definitely order them again.

Our plate of perfectly crispy pork belly, served with a side of hoisin sauce, was gigantic — more than enough for three to share. Our waitress also presented us with a diluted Hong Kong red vinegar, tangy and acidic, which we preferred to the sweet hoisin.

The steamed taro buns were tennis-ball-sized rolls of goodness of a light purple hue, and soft and fluffy in texture, imparting a subtly sweet taro flavor.

The Dim Sum Room is open daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and if your guests aren’t into dim sum, they can hit up Watami’s Asian fusion buffet and full bar instead. There’s something for everyone — small plate or large.

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